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2017 #SMSociety Theme: Social Media for Social Good or Evil

Our online behaviour is far from virtual–it extends our offline lives. Much social media research has identified the positive opportunities of using social media; for example, how people use social media to form support groups online, participate in political uprising, raise money for charities, extend teaching and learning outside the classroom, etc. However, mirroring offline experiences, we have also seen social media being used to spread propaganda and misinformation, recruit terrorists, live stream criminal activities, reinforce echo chambers by politicians, and perpetuate hate and oppression (such as racist, sexist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic behaviour).

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Session 6C [clear filter]
Sunday, July 30
 

15:30

Session 6C: Social Media Use & Users
Moderators
avatar for Zoetanya Sujon

Zoetanya Sujon

Senior Lecturer, Regent's University London

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

Social Media For Social Good: A Study Of Experiences And Opportunities In Rural Australia [FULL]
Authors: Lisa Given, Denise Winkler and Kathryn Wallis

Abstract: Social media platforms are espoused as helpful for overcoming the tyranny of distance for rural people and businesses, connecting them with local and global communities. Yet, little research has been conducted to document social media use by rural residents. This paper explores the social media experiences of 62 rural Australians, gathered through focus group and individual interviews. Results reveal the varied ways that rural residents use social media, for personal and work activities. Positive and negative perceptions of social media tools provide detailed insights into rural residents’ views. Participants highlighted opportunities to harness the potential of social media to further their business interests, to build social networks and to advocate for issues important to rural people.

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

Super Bowl Live Tweets: The Usage of Social Media during a Sporting Event
Authors: Youngsub Han, Beomseok Hong and Kwangmi Ko Kim

Abstract: The development and popularity of social networking sites (SNS) and technology have changed the audience’s media consumption patterns, particularly TV viewing. TV audiences share their viewing experiences real-time through computer-mediated communication, which creates a pseudo-communal viewing experience. Typically, social media is well known for assisting this new form of TV viewing practice. There is an emerging body of literature on what types of messages people share with others while they are watching TV and how those messages and conversations are related to the context of the program they are watching. However, little research has been conducted on social TV with a sport game. Therefore, this study plans to analyze the viewer’s social TV behaviors and engagement during a Super Bowl game and further compare whether the “coverage of conversations” is related to the nature of the game.

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

The Presentation Of Selfie In Everyday Life: Considering The Relationship Between Social Media Design And User In The Online Actions And Interactions Of Young People [FULL]
Author: Harry Dyer

Abstract: Against a backdrop of young people increasingly using an array of social media platforms for a range of social activities (Greenwood et al., 2016), accessed through a variety of devices (Lenhart, 2015), this paper reports upon the findings of a research project considering the effect of these platforms upon the actions and interactions of young people.

Reporting on findings from a series of interviews conducted over the course of a year with 9 participants, the research discusses the participants’ thoughts and impressions of the platforms, their uses of specific features, their social actions and interactions, and the effects of changes in their offline lives and their specific socio-cultural situations upon their online interactions.

The findings reveal a range of social media engagements by young people across a wide array of platforms, with the participants’ specific concerns and needs shaping how they engaged with social media. It was also found that the platforms played a role in shaping the actions and interactions of the young people, confining what was possible for them and informing how they approached social interaction on each platform. As such, it was noted that online social interactions are increasingly nuanced and multi-faceted, and therefore that an approach towards analyzing interactions online needs to account for the interplay between design and user from which unique and ongoing interactions emerge.

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

“I’m An Addict” And Other Sensemaking Devices: A Discourse Analysis Of Self-Reflections On Lived Experience Of Social Media [FULL]
Authors: Katrin Tiidenberg, Annette N Markham, Gabriel O Pereira, Mads M Rehder, Jannek K Sommer, Ramona-Riin Dremljuga and Meghan Dougherty

Abstract: How do young people make sense of their social media experiences, which rhetoric do they use, which grand narratives of technology and social media do they rely on? Based on discourse analysis of approximately 500 pages of written data and 390 minutes of video (generated by 50 college students aged 18 - 30 between 2014 - 2016) this article explores how young people negotiate their own experience and existing discourses about social media. Our analysis shows that young people rely heavily on canonic binaries from utopian and dystopian interpretations of networked technologies to apply labels to themselves, others, and social media in general. As they are prompted to reflect on their experience, they begin to add nuanced yet inherently contradictory rhetoric of social media use and its implications. This reflects a dialectical struggle to make sense of their lived experiences and feelings against dominant normative discourses. Our unique methodology for generating deeply self-reflexive, auto-ethnographic narrative accounts suggests a way for scholars to combine micro-sociological tools with auto-ethnographic approaches to understand the ongoing struggles for meaning that occur within the granularity of everyday reflections about our own social media use.

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19