Loading…
2017 #SMSociety Theme: Social Media for Social Good or Evil

Our online behaviour is far from virtual–it extends our offline lives. Much social media research has identified the positive opportunities of using social media; for example, how people use social media to form support groups online, participate in political uprising, raise money for charities, extend teaching and learning outside the classroom, etc. However, mirroring offline experiences, we have also seen social media being used to spread propaganda and misinformation, recruit terrorists, live stream criminal activities, reinforce echo chambers by politicians, and perpetuate hate and oppression (such as racist, sexist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic behaviour).

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Session 4D [clear filter]
Sunday, July 30
 

11:00

Session 4D: Public Sector
Moderators
avatar for Jaigris Hodson

Jaigris Hodson

Assistant Professor, Royal Roads University
Jaigris Hodson (B.A. Royal Roads University, M.A., Ph.D. York/Ryerson) is an Assistant Professor in Office of Interdisciplinary Studies at Royal Roads University. Her doctoral research focused on compiling and understanding the self-professed corporate identities of Facebook... Read More →

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

11:01

Investigating The Patterns And Prevalence Of UK Trade Unionism On Twitter [WIP]
Authors: Wil Chivers and Helen Blakely

Abstract: This paper reports on on-going exploratory research into the prevalence and patterns of social media use by trade unions in the United Kingdom. Social media platforms, like Twitter, are used by unions to organise and mobilise existing and potential members by communicating relevant content, which often engages politicians and the news media. However, there is little empirical research examining how trade unions use social media in practice. This research addresses this gap by employing digital methods to analyse trade union activity on Twitter: exploring key characteristics of Twitter use by UK unions; and mapping dynamic networks of associations around labour movement issues. Findings are discussed in the context of collective and connective action. The methodological implications for studying civil society organisations online are also considered.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

11:01

Retweets For Policy Advocates: Tweet Diffusion In The Policy Discussion Space Of Universal Basic Income [FULL]
Authors: Jeff Hemsley, Martha A. Garcia-Murillo and Ian P. MacInnes

Abstract: Technological advances have increasingly automated tasks that have hitherto been done by humans. The disruption to the labor market is expected to grow as more and more jobs are lost to automation. Society would benefit from the open discussion of alternative policy approaches, such as Universal Basic Income (UBI), that can alleviate social tensions related to joblessness. In this study, we examine tweets related to the discussion of UBI in an effort to understand the types of messages most likely to spread information about policy innovations, and most likely to bring new voices into the discussion. We find that messages that resonate with users are more likely to reach new audiences and bring new actors into the discussion space. Our work offers prescriptions for policy advocates, and provides insights for social scientists studying Twitter and policy and information diffusion.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

11:01

Social Media Use By Government In Canada: Examining Interactions Of Immigration, Refugees And Citizenship Canada On Twitter And Facebook [WIP]
Authors: Maria Gintova

Abstract: In 2011, the need to use social media to interact with the public was acknowledged as a priority for Canadian government for the first time. The Open Dialogue stream of initiatives within the Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government called for a two-way dialogue between the Government of Canada and the public. Currently, the majority of government agencies use social media. However, they are still exploring the ways of using these new tools as a part of existing communication channels. As recent studies suggest, government does not consider social media as a way to engage public in government business but rather solely views it as a new means to provide information. This information might be already available on the government agency website.
This paper examines how one of the federal government agencies - Immigration, Citizenship and Refugees Canada (IRCC) uses social media. As the analysis shows, IRCC does interact with the public by answering questions, providing information about its programs and services and sharing information posted on other accounts. The findings indicate that (1) IRCC engages much more actively on Twitter than on Facebook; (2) IRCC views Twitter as a way to answers questions that immigrants, students, workers, visitors to Canada as well as Canadian citizens and permanent residents might have about its programs and services and (3) IRCC does not usually seek opinions and engage on policy development issues neither on Twitter nor on Facebook.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

11:01

The Paris Climate Talks (COP21) In Visual Social Media [WIP]
Authors: Jill Hopke and Luis Hestres

Abstract: Within networked, digital media spaces, new news platforms are reconfiguring traditional news production norms through hybrid cultural practices, giving rise to new paradigms of journalism. There is an increased emphasis on transparency and accountability, as well as interaction with audiences. At the same time, Internet-mediated activism allows individuals to foster larger, more diverse networks of weak ties, thus opening new avenues for advocacy communication. Climate change is increasingly becoming the backdrop to news stories on topics as varied as politics and international relations, science and the environment, economics and inequality, and popular culture. We use the Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP21) that took place in Paris November 30 to December 11, 2015, as a case study. The project focuses on COP21 coverage by British news outlet The Guardian, which launched a fossil fuel divestment campaign “Keep it In the Ground” in advance of COP21. We compare The Guardian’s discussion of climate solutions during COP21 with other news outlets and climate stakeholders.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19