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2017 #SMSociety Theme: Social Media for Social Good or Evil

Our online behaviour is far from virtual–it extends our offline lives. Much social media research has identified the positive opportunities of using social media; for example, how people use social media to form support groups online, participate in political uprising, raise money for charities, extend teaching and learning outside the classroom, etc. However, mirroring offline experiences, we have also seen social media being used to spread propaganda and misinformation, recruit terrorists, live stream criminal activities, reinforce echo chambers by politicians, and perpetuate hate and oppression (such as racist, sexist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic behaviour).

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Session 4C [clear filter]
Sunday, July 30
 

11:00

Session 4C: Business: Opportunities & Practices
Moderators
avatar for Donna Smith

Donna Smith

Professor, Ryerson University
Donna's research focus is on commitment-trust applied to B2B and B2C settings. She is studying social media campaigns initiated by retailers.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Branding Practices In The New(Er) Media: A Comparison Of Retailer Twitter And Web-Based Images [WIP]
Author: James Lannigan

Abstract: In this working paper I compare how retailers of different size use webpages and social media. I examine over 2800 unique images from 86 retailers, using a quantitative content analysis that enumerates visual elements within pictures. I find that there are significant differences in the use of these two mediums in terms of retailer scale, and that based on their size, retailers display different types of images at much different proportions.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Crisis And Collective Problem Solving In Dark Web: An Exploration Of A Black Hat Forum [WIP]
Authors: K. Hazel Kwon, J. Hunter Priniski, Soumajyoti Sarkar, Jana Shakarian and Paulo Shakarian

Abstract: This paper explores the process of collective crisis problem-solving in the darkweb. We conducted a preliminary study on “The Hub”, one of the Tor-based darkweb forums, during the shutdown of two marketplaces. Content analysis suggests that distrusts permeated the forum during the marketplace shutdowns. Much of sense-making effort was made to the debates concerned with suspicious claims and conspiracies. The results suggest that a market crisis potentially offers an opportunity for cyber-intelligence to disrupt the darkweb by engendering internal conflicts. At the same time, the study also shows that darkweb members were adept at reaching collective solutions by sharing new market information, more secure technologies, and alternative routes for economic activities.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

The Political Economy Of Social Data. A Historical Analysis Of Platform–Industry Partnerships [WIP]
Authors: Anne Helmond, David Nieborg and Fernando van der Vlist

Abstract: Social media industry partnerships are essential to understand the politics and economics of social data flowing between platforms and third-parties. We investigate how platform partnerships evolve over time to understand (i) the dynamic roles of platforms and partners as data brokers, (ii) their diversification by catering to a growing number of stakeholders, all with distinct interests, and (iii) their gradual entrenchment as dominant actors within the internet industry. We focus on Facebook the dominant platform that functions both as data aggregator and marketing platform that operates multiple dedicated partner programs and that cater to a wide array of industry partners. We employ a mixed methods approach. On the one hand, “digital methods” for mapping partnerships over time using archived pages of Facebook’s official partner program directories, as well as developer documentation from the Internet Archive to enquire into changing partnership types. On the other hand, we conducted semi-structured interviews with selected partners to contextualize their distinct roles, positions, and data strategies within the industry. By considering how partnership alliances are forged and subsequently dissolved over time, we offer insights into “stakeholder politics” as well as platforms’ entrenchment within the Internet industry. In brief, we aim to develop a critical account of the political economy of social data by addressing the infrastructural dimension of platform data power.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

TweetSight: Enhancing Financial Analysts' Social Media Use [FULL]
Authors: Rama Adithya Varanasi, Benjamin Hanrahan, Shahtab Wahid and John Carroll

Abstract: Financial analysts utilize information from heterogeneous sources (for example, corporate filings, economic indicators, news, and tweets) to generate unique trade ideas through a sensemaking process. In this paper, we seek to understand the role of social media in this process. We conducted a semi-structured interview and identified essential benefits and barriers for the primary social media platform used by the analysts - Twitter. Analysts use Twitter as a query exploration tool, as a bellwether to understand sentiment, and to gauge knock-on effects. Drawing from our findings, we developed four scenarios to guide the design of TweetSight. Finally, we evaluated the design of TweetSight by walking analysts through the prototype. Analysts responded positively to anchoring contextual tweets in news articles to facilitate discovery and exploration of Twitter. Our findings and design implications can be applied more broadly to leveraging social media for sensemaking, benefiting various business communities.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9