Loading…
2017 #SMSociety Theme: Social Media for Social Good or Evil

Our online behaviour is far from virtual–it extends our offline lives. Much social media research has identified the positive opportunities of using social media; for example, how people use social media to form support groups online, participate in political uprising, raise money for charities, extend teaching and learning outside the classroom, etc. However, mirroring offline experiences, we have also seen social media being used to spread propaganda and misinformation, recruit terrorists, live stream criminal activities, reinforce echo chambers by politicians, and perpetuate hate and oppression (such as racist, sexist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic behaviour).

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Session 4B [clear filter]
Sunday, July 30
 

11:00

Session 4B: Rumors & (In)Civility
Moderators
avatar for Katrin Tiidenberg

Katrin Tiidenberg

Associate Professor, Tallinn University

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

A Study Of Tweet Veracity: Separating Rumors From Counter-Rumors [FULL]
Authors: Alton Chua and Snehasish Banerjee

Abstract: Rumors are known to propagate easily through computer-mediated communication channels such as Twitter. Their outbreak is often followed by the spread of counter-rumors, which are messages that debunk rumors. The likelihood of a tweet to be either a rumor or a counter-rumor is referred as tweet veracity in this paper. Since both rumors and counter-rumors are expected to contain claims, the two might not be easily distinguishable. If Internet users fail to separate rumors from counter-rumors, the latter will not serve its purpose. Hence, this paper investigates the extent to which tweet veracity could be predicted by content as well as contributors’ profile. The investigation focuses on the death hoax case of Singapore’s first prime minister Lee Kuan Yew on Twitter. A total of 1,000 tweets (500 rumors + 500 counter-rumors) are analyzed using binomial logistic regression. Results indicate that tweet veracity could be predicted by clarity, proper nouns, visual cues, references to credible sources as well as contributors’ duration of membership, and number of followers. The significance of these findings are highlighted.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Angels And Devils Of Digital Social Norm Enforcement: A Theory About Aggressive Versus Civilized Online Comments [FULL]
Authors: Lea Stahel and Katja Rost

Abstract: We develop a theory explaining when commenters choose to be aggressive versus civilized in social media depending on their personal social norm context. In particular, we enrich traditional social norm theory by the concept of moral legitimacy: it suggests that justifications, particularly those that put social norm violators outside of moral boundaries, are the supplier of aggression. Using the diversity of 45’982 comments of a real-world online firestorm our results confirm that social norm contexts matter strongly for online behaviour. The developed theory challenges existing speculations about online aggression and helps to develop strategies to encourage enlightened, civilized discourse in the Internet.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Comparing Civility And Inclusiveness Of E-Discussion Forum And Radio Talk Platform [WIP]
Authors: Shreenita Ghosh and Ritomaitree Sarkar

Abstract: This study examines the user comments of radio talk show call-ins and the shows’ corresponding digital discussion forums comments of NPR’s show ‘OnPoint’. While both media platforms are anonymous and moderated rigorously by NPR staff, the nature and content of the comments in both are vastly different. A frequency analysis followed by critical discourse analysis of the content suggests that the percentage civility of the content in both media, when measured through Papacharissi (2004) coding scheme, is very similar. However, the study shows difference in inclusivity, variety in content and degree of incivility. The study further hints that the role of moderator, the role of screener, and lastly the difference in the location of time gap or time lag between the generation of content and the public release of content in final form may be possible reasons that contribute to the difference in nature of interaction in the two ‘faceless’ mediated discursive spaces.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

The Collaborative Construction And Evolution Of Pseudo-Knowledge In Online Conversations [FULL]
Authors: Joshua Introne, Luca Iandoli, Julia Decook, Irem Gokce Yildirim and Shaimaa Elzeini

Abstract: Misinformation has found a new natural habitat in the digital age. Thousands of forums, blogs, and alternative news sources amplify inaccurate information to such a degree that it impacts our collective intelligence. Widespread misinformation is troubling not just because it is wrong, but also because it can persist in the face of attempts to correct it, becoming part of a larger culture of community-based pseudoknowledge (PK). Prior work has focused on the motivations and psychology of those who create and maintain PK but has eschewed inspection of the dynamics of collective PK production itself. In this exploratory case study, we illustrate how the active participation of multiple collaborators adapts PK over time through a process we liken to participatory storytelling. We argue that the Internet provides a uniquely well-suited environment for evolving PK that is “more fit” in that it is more engaging, easier to defend, and possibly easier to spread.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9