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2017 #SMSociety Theme: Social Media for Social Good or Evil

Our online behaviour is far from virtual–it extends our offline lives. Much social media research has identified the positive opportunities of using social media; for example, how people use social media to form support groups online, participate in political uprising, raise money for charities, extend teaching and learning outside the classroom, etc. However, mirroring offline experiences, we have also seen social media being used to spread propaganda and misinformation, recruit terrorists, live stream criminal activities, reinforce echo chambers by politicians, and perpetuate hate and oppression (such as racist, sexist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic behaviour).

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Session 3D [clear filter]
Saturday, July 29
 

15:30

Session 3D: Young People & Social Media Data
Moderators
avatar for Anabel Quan-Haase

Anabel Quan-Haase

Professor, Western University
Looking forward to hearing about novel methods in the study of social media, new trends, and social activism. I am also curious about interdisciplinary teams and how they work. Any success stories, best practices or failures?

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

Clickwrap Impact: Quick-Join Options And Ignoring Privacy And Terms Of Service Policies Of Social Networking Services [WIP]
Authors: Jonathan Obar and Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch

Abstract: A qualitative survey analysis was conducted, assessing user interactions with the consent materials of a fictitious social networking service, NameDrop. Findings reveal that the clickwrap quick-join option, common to social networking services, hinders consent processes by making privacy and terms of service policies difficult to find, and by discouraging engagement with privacy and reputation protections by suggesting that consent materials are unimportant. Implications for the future of notice policy are discussed.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

Context Collapse And Student Social Media Networks: Where Life And High School Collide [WIP]
Authors: Vanessa Dennen, Stacey Rutledge, Lauren Bagdy, Jerrica Rowlett, Shannon Burnick and Sarah Joyce

Abstract: This study examines the intersection of high school students’ in-school and out-of-school communities in a social media context. Students in two classes (10th and 12th grade) participated in a 3-day unit about social media networks and context collapse. During this unit, they diagrammed their communities and social media tool networks and discussed related issues governing how they use social media in and out of school. Findings show that high school students experience context collapse, but do not view it as a negative occurrence so much as an expected one in networked digital environments. They are adept at managing context collapse, and use a variety of means to communicate online with different groups of people. Specifically, they maintain technological lines of separation between their family and other groups, and they relegate digital interactions with their closest friends to more private spaces than the ones that social networking tools afford.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

What Is Your Data Silhouette? Raising Teen Awareness Of Their Data Traces In Social Media [WIP]
Authors: Amelia Acker and Leanne Bowler

Abstract: The paper reports on a series of data literacy workshops for young people ages 11 to 17, held in three Pittsburgh-area public libraries during Fall 2016. The workshops, called Data Silhouettes, served two purposes. First, as a mechanism for examining young peoples’ understandings of their data worlds and secondly, to pilot test a library-based learning experience designed to reveal the relationship between social media behaviour and the data traces left behind.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

‘My Data, My Bad …’ - Young People’s Personal Data Understandings And (Counter)Practices [WIP]
Authors: Luci Pangrazio and Neil Selwyn

Abstract: Large quantities of personal data are now being generated, collated and processed through young people’s uses of social media. Third parties increasingly use these data to profile, predict and position the individuals they are associated with. These developments have prompted calls for individuals to adopt more informed and critical stances toward how and why their data is being used – i.e. to become vigilant ‘data citizens’. Against this background, this paper reports on an ongoing project that explores the extent to which social media users are aware of their personal data and its attendant issues/uses. Drawing on participatory design research with four diverse groups of young people (aged 14 to 18 years), this paper investigates the possibilities of making third party (re)uses of personal data openly available in digitized form for young people to access, interpret and use to develop counter-practices and resistant tactics. The results of these interventions – while only partially successful – provide valuable insights into the technical, informatic, organizational and social issues surrounding how young people engage with social media, and how academic concerns over data relate to everyday lived experiences of social media use in a digital age.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19