Loading…
2017 #SMSociety Theme: Social Media for Social Good or Evil

Our online behaviour is far from virtual–it extends our offline lives. Much social media research has identified the positive opportunities of using social media; for example, how people use social media to form support groups online, participate in political uprising, raise money for charities, extend teaching and learning outside the classroom, etc. However, mirroring offline experiences, we have also seen social media being used to spread propaganda and misinformation, recruit terrorists, live stream criminal activities, reinforce echo chambers by politicians, and perpetuate hate and oppression (such as racist, sexist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic behaviour).

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Session 3B [clear filter]
Saturday, July 29
 

15:30

Session 3B: Language, Music & Culture
Moderators
avatar for Elliot Panek

Elliot Panek

Assistant Professor, The University of Alabama
I am currently researching the social dynamics of online communities (Reddit, in particular). I also research the relationship between social media use and a variety of psychological factors (e.g., narcissism and self-control), as well as media selection behavior. I'd love to talk... Read More →

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:31

Challenging Music Education: The Transformative Potential Of Social Media [WIP]
Authors: Stephanie Horsley and Janice Waldron

Abstract: Music is a ubiquitous phenomenon that is used to shape personal, community, and cultural identities and forms the basis of significant economic activity and engagement. Given that musical activities are predicated on social interaction, the potential of social media to intensify and extend musical action has significant implications for developing a critical approach to music education for twenty-first century citizens. This paper explores the intersection of social media, educational theory, and music education to argue for the importance of transforming elements of music education to reflect the ways in which individuals currently navigate the various uses (and abuses) of music in a digitally networked society, where music is a powerful social and cultural tool. A current exploratory study of post-secondary music education classes is discussed, and the implications for a “future” music education are presented.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:31

Glyphexts (Glyphs + Text = Effect) As Information Divide: Screen Reader Impact On Interpreting Sentimentality In Online Social Media Review Posts [WIP]
Author: Laurie Bonnici

Abstract: Subjective information in the form of online social media (OSM) opinion posts increasingly functions as useful information in times of uncertainty. Sentimentality frequently expressed in OSM posts includes emotions such as excitement, disbelief, and rhetoric. Sentimentality is conveyed through glyphs expressed in isolation (?) or (!), success repetition (????), (!!!!!), or (?!), and non-standard punctuation such as the interrobang (‽).Application of a nascent lens, Cognitive Authority Framework – Quality Information Source (CAF-QIS) has revealed that the application of glyphs is commonly and frequently applied in OSM. Yet accessibility software employed by those with visual challenges allows for filtering of extra-character content in documents, including web content such as OSM. Some screen readers exclude conveyance of glyphs entirely. Through open-ended survey responses and first-hand interview accounts with visually challenged users active on OSM opinion sites, this project seeks to uncover deeper understanding of how they determine trustworthiness of opinions and better opportunities to access emotionally informed subjective content. The concept of glyphicality provides a lens to interpret sentimentality within the specialized social media domain.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:31

Information Flow On Digital Social Networks During A Cultural Event: Methodology And Analysis Of The “European Night Of Museums 2016” On Twitter [FULL]
Authors: Brigitte Juanals and Jean-Luc Minel

Abstract: In this paper, we present first, a representation of flows of messages and their contents on Twitter, then an instrumented methodology to describe and analyze these flows and their distributions in relation with the stakeholders which reflects engagement and interactions between different types of stakeholders. We apply our methodology and associated tools on the 12th edition of the cultural event "European Night of Museums" (#NDM16).

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:31

Translation, Social Media, And The Concept Of Augmentation: The Good, The Bad, And The Interdisciplinary [WIP]
Author: Renée Desjardins

Abstract: This paper begins with an assessment of how the digital landscape has impacted the Canadian language services industry, with specific attention given to the relationship between social media and translation. While social media has generally created new opportunities for language experts (the “good”), it is our hypothesis that there remains a significant lack of consilience between the two industry sectors (the “bad”). We believe that by underscoring the common ground between Translation Studies and Social Media Studies (the “interdisciplinary”), we may find ways of ‘augmenting’ (cf. Davenport and Kirby, 2015) the status and role of professional human translators. We explore three specific areas in this research: the value-added of professional translators in the context of social media monitoring; self-translation phenomena on social platforms such as Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter; and, finally, the necessity of human intervention in the translation of ‘new’ social languages such as Emoji. This research speaks to anyone interested in intercultural communication in online setting (specifically on social media). It can also be of interest to social platforms looking to embed translation applications within their platforms to optimize the user’s experience. We leverage the methodological framework of Descriptive Translation Studies applied to social media monitoring and incorporate real-world examples to support our hypotheses.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9