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2017 #SMSociety Theme: Social Media for Social Good or Evil

Our online behaviour is far from virtual–it extends our offline lives. Much social media research has identified the positive opportunities of using social media; for example, how people use social media to form support groups online, participate in political uprising, raise money for charities, extend teaching and learning outside the classroom, etc. However, mirroring offline experiences, we have also seen social media being used to spread propaganda and misinformation, recruit terrorists, live stream criminal activities, reinforce echo chambers by politicians, and perpetuate hate and oppression (such as racist, sexist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic behaviour).

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Friday, July 28
 

08:30

Registration & Coffee Reception
Join us for morning coffee and fresh pastries!

Friday July 28, 2017 08:30 - 09:00
TRS 1-148 & 1-150 TRSM Commons - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

09:00

Workshop 1A: Augmenting Social Media through Data Linkage

Workshop Facilitators

Dr. Luke Sloan
, Cardiff University (UK)
Dr. Anabel Quan-Haase, Western University (Canada)
Dr. Dhiraj Murthy, University of Texas at Austin (USA)
Dr. Frauke Zeller, Ryerson University (Canada)


Workshop Details 

Objectives: 

1) To explore the opportunities afforded through linking social media with other forms of data

2) To evaluate the benefits of linking data against ethical concerns

3) To identify hurdles around informed consent for data linkage

4) To engage participants in discussions

Presenters will lead a series of short sessions around their specialist topic. Each presenter will begin with a maximum 10 min talk identifying the key issues and considerations involved in their area of research. They will then set a group task for participants to engage in, involving discussions in groups of around 8 and feeding back via plenary.

Presenters will talk to the following topics:

SLOAN will make the case for linking data (specifically Twitter and social surveys). Drawing on the augmentation thesis (Edwards et al. 2013), he will argue that social media does not replace existing avenues of social research, rather that it augments our understanding through providing an alternative lens through which to view the social world. He will draw upon research which has attempted to address the lack of demographic information available regarding Twitter users (Sloan et al. 2013, Sloan et al. 2015, Sloan and Morgan 2015) and make the case for data linkage to further increase the utility of the data. In particular he will discuss recent studies that have requested permission to link data including British Social Attitudes 2015 and the Understanding Society Innovation Panel 2017 and what opportunities these afford us.

Group Activity: Group Work - generation of research questions that can only be answered with linked data.

QUAN- HAASE will examine novel and innovative means of linking data from multiple sources that takes into account ethical debates in the field of social media research. Linking data is considered the new frontier of social media scholarship, as it provides many advantages over decontextualized and flat data (Quan-Haase and Sloan, 2017). Linking data is no easy task, and several attempts have demonstrated the challenges— technical and ethical—over bridging various data sources. In this workshop section, a novel and innovative approach to data linking will be discussed that relies on combining data from interviews with social media data. By specifically obtaining consent from participants prior to data linking, the accuracy of the data can be verified and ethical concerns addressed. We demonstrate both the strengths and limitations of the approach.

Group Activity: Group Work – gaining informed consent for social media data linkage

MURTHY will address questions of data linkage in areas of human coding. Many types of data linkage are premised on metadata. However, many types of content do not have ready metadata for the types of things that we may like to study. Specifically, methods such as text mining and topic modeling often times are quite literal. This is further problematized with visual social media data (when the machine has much more difficulty reading what exactly an image is trying to convey). In this workshop section, Murthy makes the case for methods of human coding that enable us to understand social media data well and produce data linkages that take into account ethical concerns. Using his own projects where Instagram images and tweets were coded, Murthy introduces methods that can be implemented in qualitative, quantitative, and mixed social media research settings.

Group Activity: Discussion - what can be linked?

ZELLER will discuss her approach to linking data in method-mix study designs as a means to first of all combine quantitative and qualitative methods and second of all to overcome certain deficits in social media data, such as lack of demographic information and/or means to verify information. She will showcase a mixed-methods study on analysing Facebook images and image captions using quantitative corpus linguistics and qualitative image analysis. She will discuss ethical implications using Facebook perse, but also issues such as data discrimination and inclusion when it comes to image analyses in social media.

Group Activity: Discussion - what does your profile say about you?

Workshop participants can expect to have learnt: 

  • What opportunities linked data can provide and what new avenues of research could be made available to the academic community
  • How data can be linked between social surveys and some social media platforms
  • What the key ethical issues are in linking data and how we can respond to them
  • How to approach gaining informed consent for data linkage

Instructors’ Bios

Luke Sloan is a Senior Lecturer in Quantitative Methods and Deputy Director of the Social Data Science Lab at the School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University, UK. Luke has worked on a range of projects investigating the use of Twitter data for understanding social phenomena covering topics such as election prediction, tracking (mis)information propagation during food scares and ‘crime-sensing’. His research focuses on the development of demographic proxies for Twitter data to further understand who uses the platform and increase the utility of such data for the social sciences. He sits as an expert member on the Social Media Analytics Review and Information Group (SMARIG) which brings together academics and government agencies. He is currently involved with three large UK-based social survey studies that are exploring potential linkage between Twitter and survey data – the Welsh Election Study, British Social Attitudes 2015 and the Understanding Society Innovation Panel 2017.

Anabel Quan-Haase is an Associate Professor and holds a joint appointment at the Faculty of Information and Media Studies and the Department of Sociology, the University of Western Ontario. She is the director of the SocioDigital Lab and her research interests focus on how people integrate social media into their everyday lives and work settings. Her particular focus is on user engagement and the role of social context in how individuals use and make sense of messages and interactions on social media. Dr. Quan-Haase is the author of Technology and Society (2016, 2nd ed. with Oxford University Press) and co-editor with Luke Sloan of the Handbook of Social Media Research Methods (2017 with Sage). She is the past president of the Canadian Association for Information Science and a past Council Member and Secretary of the CITAMS section of the American Sociological Association.

Dhiraj Murthy is an Associate Professor of Journalism and Sociology at the University of Texas Austin. He was previously Reader of Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London. His research explores social media, digital research methods, race/ethnicity, qualitative/mixed methods, big data quantitative analysis, and virtual organizations. Dhiraj has authored over 40 articles, book chapters, and papers and a book about Twitter, the first on the subject (published by Polity Press, 2013). He was funded by the National Science Foundation’s Office of CyberInfrastructure for pioneering work on social networking technologies in virtual organization breeding grounds, which resulted in two edited journal issues and the Collaborative Organizations & Social Media conference. Dhiraj’s work also uniquely explores the potential role of social technologies in diversity and community inclusion. He previously co-directed The Centre for Creative & Social Technologies at Goldsmiths and founded the Social Network Innovation Lab at Bowdoin College. He is chair of Social Media, Activism, and Organisations (#SMAO15) and a co-chair of Social Media & Society 2016.

Frauke Zeller is Associate Professor in the School of Professional Communication at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada. Frauke works with social media data and digital communication focusing on the development of innovative mixed-methods approaches. She has also published in the field of social sciences and big data analyses, and co-edited a book on method innovations in European audience studies. Besides analysing social media data, Frauke researches other digital communication environments, such as virtual worlds and Human-Robot Interaction.

References

Edwards, A., Housley, W., Williams, M., Sloan, L., & Williams, M. (2013). Digital social research, social media and the sociological imagination: surrogacy, augmentation and re-orientation. International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 16(3), 245-260. doi: 10.1080/13645579.2013.774185

Quan-Haase, A. & Sloan, L. (forthcoming 2017). Introduction to the Handbook of Social Media Research Methods: Goals, Challenges and Innovations. In L. Sloan & A. Quan- Haase (Eds.), The Sage Handbook of Social Media Research Methods. London: SAGE.

Sloan, L., Morgan, J., Housley, W., Williams, M., Edwards, A., Burnap, P., & Rana, O. (2013). Knowing the Tweeters: Deriving Sociologically Relevant Demographics from Twitter. Sociological Research Online, 18

...

Workshop Organizers
DM

dhiraj murthy

Associate Professor, The University of Texas at Austin
avatar for Anabel Quan-Haase

Anabel Quan-Haase

Professor, Western University
Looking forward to hearing about novel methods in the study of social media, new trends, and social activism. I am also curious about interdisciplinary teams and how they work. Any success stories, best practices or failures?
avatar for Luke Sloan

Luke Sloan

Deputy Director Social Data Science Lab, Cardiff University
Luke Sloan is a Senior Lecturer in Quantitative Methods and Deputy Director of the Social Data Science Lab at the School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University UK. Luke has worked on a range of projects investigating the use of Twitter data for understanding social phenomena covering... Read More →
avatar for Frauke Zeller

Frauke Zeller

Associate Professor, Ryerson University
I am the co-creator of hitchBOT!


Friday July 28, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

09:00

Workshop 1B: Networks for Newbies
Workshop Facilitator

Dr. Barry Wellman
, NetLab Network (Canada)

Workshop Details

This is a non-technical introduction to social network analysis. It describes the development for social network analysis, key concepts, and key substantive methods and findings. It is aimed at newcomers to the field, and those who have only seen social network analysis as a method.

Instructor’s Bio

Barry Wellman, FRSC is a Canadian-American sociologist and is the co-director of the Toronto-based international NetLab Network. His areas of research are community sociology, the Internet, human-computer interaction and social structure, as manifested in social networks in communities and organizations. His overarching interest is in the paradigm shift from group-centered relations to networked individualism. He has written or co-authored more than 300 articles, chapters, reports and books. Wellman was a professor at the Department of Sociology, University of Toronto for 46 years, from 1967 to 2013, including a five-year stint as S.D. Clark Professor. 

 

Workshop Organizers
avatar for Barry Wellman

Barry Wellman

Co-Director, NetLab Network
I'm involved in studying Networked Individualism-how Torontonians incorporate digital media into their everyday social networks; and Networked Work and Research-how coworkers collaborate in multiple teams, often far-flung. I've co-authored the double-award winner Networked: The New... Read More →


Friday July 28, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

09:00

Workshop 1C: Text Analytics for Social Data Using DiscoverText & Sifter

Workshop Facilitator

Dr. Stu Shulman
, Texifter (USA)

Workshop Details

Participate in this workshop to learn how to build custom machine classifiers for sifting social media data. The topics covered include how to:

  • construct precise social data fetch queries,
  • use Boolean search on resulting archives,
  • filter on metadata or other project attributes,
  • count and set aside duplicates, cluster near-duplicates,
  • crowd source human coding,
  • measure inter-rater reliability,
  • adjudicate coder disagreements, and
  • build high quality word sense and topic disambiguation engines.

DiscoverText is designed specifically for collecting and cleaning up messy Twitter data streams. Use basic research measurement tools to improve human and machine performance classifying Twitter data over time. The workshop covers how to reach and substantiate inferences using a theoretical and applied model informed by a decade of interdisciplinary, National Science Foundation-funded research into the text classification problem.

Participants will learn how to apply “CoderRank” in machine-learning. Just as Google said not all web pages are created equal, links on some pages rank higher than others, Dr. Shulman argues not all human coders are created equal; the accuracy of observations by some coders on any task invariably rank higher than others. The major idea of the workshop is that when training machines for text analysis, greater reliance should be placed on the input of those humans most likely to create a valid observation. Texifter proposed a unique way to recursively validate, measure, and rank humans on trust and knowledge vectors, and called it CoderRank.

Instructor’s Bio

Dr. Stuart W. Shulman is founder & CEO of Texifter.  He was a Research Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the founding Director of the Qualitative Data Analysis Program (QDAP) at the University of Pittsburgh and at UMass Amherst. Dr. Shulman is Editor Emeritus of the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, the official journal of Information Technology & Politics section of the American Political Science Association.


Workshop Organizers
avatar for Stu Shulman

Stu Shulman

CEO, Texifter
Dr. Stuart W. Shulman is the founder and CEO of Texifter. Stu was formerly a UMass Amherst political science professor and the Vice President for Text Analytics at Vision Critical. Dr. Shulman is the sole inventor of the Coding Analysis Toolkit (CAT), an open source, Web-based text... Read More →


Friday July 28, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

09:00

Workshop 1D: Tracing mobile connections with digital traces: a multi-method approach

Workshop Facilitator

Dr. Jeffrey Boase
, Associate Professor in the Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology and the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto (Canada)
 


Workshop Details 

The first part of this workshop will review arguments and empirical findings regarding the role of mobile phone use in personal networks. The second part of the workshop will focus on discussing a newly developed multi-method approach to combining mobile calling and texting log data with traditional survey and interview techniques. This approach involves a system in which an online portal is used to customize the actions of a smartphone based data collection application. These actions include the collection of non-identifying calling and texting log data, on-screen survey questions, and dynamically drawing on log data to generate questions and stimuli for use during in-person interviews. After discussing this method we will have a hands-on exercise with the online portal and app. Respondents are encouraged to bring an Android phone to the workshop in order to fully participate in this exercise. 

Bio

Dr. Jeffrey Boase is an Associate Professor in the Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology and the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on the relationship between communication technology and personal networks. He is particularly interested in how emerging technologies such as smartphones and social media platforms may enable or hinder the transfer of information and support within personal networks. In recent years he has incorporated digital trace data into his project designs, merging it with more traditional survey and interview data.

 

 


Workshop Organizers
avatar for Jeffrey Boase

Jeffrey Boase

Associate Professor, University of Toronto


Friday July 28, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

10:30

Coffee Break
Friday July 28, 2017 10:30 - 11:00
TRS 1-148 & 1-150 TRSM Commons - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

11:00

Workshop 1A: Augmenting Social Media through Data Linkage (PART 2)

THIS IS PART 2 OF THIS WORKSHOP, PLEASE MAKE SURE TO SIGN-UP FOR PART 1. 

Workshop Facilitators

Dr. Luke Sloan
, Cardiff University (UK)
Dr. Anabel Quan-Haase, Western University (Canada)
Dr. Dhiraj Murthy, University of Texas at Austin (USA)
Dr. Frauke Zeller, Ryerson University (Canada)


Workshop Details 

Objectives: 

1) To explore the opportunities afforded through linking social media with other forms of data

2) To evaluate the benefits of linking data against ethical concerns

3) To identify hurdles around informed consent for data linkage

4) To engage participants in discussions

Presenters will lead a series of short sessions around their specialist topic. Each presenter will begin with a maximum 10 min talk identifying the key issues and considerations involved in their area of research. They will then set a group task for participants to engage in, involving discussions in groups of around 8 and feeding back via plenary.

Presenters will talk to the following topics:

SLOAN will make the case for linking data (specifically Twitter and social surveys). Drawing on the augmentation thesis (Edwards et al. 2013), he will argue that social media does not replace existing avenues of social research, rather that it augments our understanding through providing an alternative lens through which to view the social world. He will draw upon research which has attempted to address the lack of demographic information available regarding Twitter users (Sloan et al. 2013, Sloan et al. 2015, Sloan and Morgan 2015) and make the case for data linkage to further increase the utility of the data. In particular he will discuss recent studies that have requested permission to link data including British Social Attitudes 2015 and the Understanding Society Innovation Panel 2017 and what opportunities these afford us.

Group Activity: Group Work - generation of research questions that can only be answered with linked data.

QUAN- HAASE will examine novel and innovative means of linking data from multiple sources that takes into account ethical debates in the field of social media research. Linking data is considered the new frontier of social media scholarship, as it provides many advantages over decontextualized and flat data (Quan-Haase and Sloan, 2017). Linking data is no easy task, and several attempts have demonstrated the challenges— technical and ethical—over bridging various data sources. In this workshop section, a novel and innovative approach to data linking will be discussed that relies on combining data from interviews with social media data. By specifically obtaining consent from participants prior to data linking, the accuracy of the data can be verified and ethical concerns addressed. We demonstrate both the strengths and limitations of the approach.

Group Activity: Group Work – gaining informed consent for social media data linkage

MURTHY will address questions of data linkage in areas of human coding. Many types of data linkage are premised on metadata. However, many types of content do not have ready metadata for the types of things that we may like to study. Specifically, methods such as text mining and topic modeling often times are quite literal. This is further problematized with visual social media data (when the machine has much more difficulty reading what exactly an image is trying to convey). In this workshop section, Murthy makes the case for methods of human coding that enable us to understand social media data well and produce data linkages that take into account ethical concerns. Using his own projects where Instagram images and tweets were coded, Murthy introduces methods that can be implemented in qualitative, quantitative, and mixed social media research settings.

Group Activity: Discussion - what can be linked?

ZELLER will discuss her approach to linking data in method-mix study designs as a means to first of all combine quantitative and qualitative methods and second of all to overcome certain deficits in social media data, such as lack of demographic information and/or means to verify information. She will showcase a mixed-methods study on analysing Facebook images and image captions using quantitative corpus linguistics and qualitative image analysis. She will discuss ethical implications using Facebook perse, but also issues such as data discrimination and inclusion when it comes to image analyses in social media.

Group Activity: Discussion - what does your profile say about you?

Workshop participants can expect to have learnt: 

  • What opportunities linked data can provide and what new avenues of research could be made available to the academic community
  • How data can be linked between social surveys and some social media platforms
  • What the key ethical issues are in linking data and how we can respond to them
  • How to approach gaining informed consent for data linkage

Instructors’ Bios

Luke Sloan is a Senior Lecturer in Quantitative Methods and Deputy Director of the Social Data Science Lab at the School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University, UK. Luke has worked on a range of projects investigating the use of Twitter data for understanding social phenomena covering topics such as election prediction, tracking (mis)information propagation during food scares and ‘crime-sensing’. His research focuses on the development of demographic proxies for Twitter data to further understand who uses the platform and increase the utility of such data for the social sciences. He sits as an expert member on the Social Media Analytics Review and Information Group (SMARIG) which brings together academics and government agencies. He is currently involved with three large UK-based social survey studies that are exploring potential linkage between Twitter and survey data – the Welsh Election Study, British Social Attitudes 2015 and the Understanding Society Innovation Panel 2017.

Anabel Quan-Haase is an Associate Professor and holds a joint appointment at the Faculty of Information and Media Studies and the Department of Sociology, the University of Western Ontario. She is the director of the SocioDigital Lab and her research interests focus on how people integrate social media into their everyday lives and work settings. Her particular focus is on user engagement and the role of social context in how individuals use and make sense of messages and interactions on social media. Dr. Quan-Haase is the author of Technology and Society (2016, 2nd ed. with Oxford University Press) and co-editor with Luke Sloan of the Handbook of Social Media Research Methods (2017 with Sage). She is the past president of the Canadian Association for Information Science and a past Council Member and Secretary of the CITAMS section of the American Sociological Association.

Dhiraj Murthy is an Associate Professor of Journalism and Sociology at the University of Texas Austin. He was previously Reader of Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London. His research explores social media, digital research methods, race/ethnicity, qualitative/mixed methods, big data quantitative analysis, and virtual organizations. Dhiraj has authored over 40 articles, book chapters, and papers and a book about Twitter, the first on the subject (published by Polity Press, 2013). He was funded by the National Science Foundation’s Office of CyberInfrastructure for pioneering work on social networking technologies in virtual organization breeding grounds, which resulted in two edited journal issues and the Collaborative Organizations & Social Media conference. Dhiraj’s work also uniquely explores the potential role of social technologies in diversity and community inclusion. He previously co-directed The Centre for Creative & Social Technologies at Goldsmiths and founded the Social Network Innovation Lab at Bowdoin College. He is chair of Social Media, Activism, and Organisations (#SMAO15) and a co-chair of Social Media & Society 2016.

Frauke Zeller is Associate Professor in the School of Professional Communication at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada. Frauke works with social media data and digital communication focusing on the development of innovative mixed-methods approaches. She has also published in the field of social sciences and big data analyses, and co-edited a book on method innovations in European audience studies. Besides analysing social media data, Frauke researches other digital communication environments, such as virtual worlds and Human-Robot Interaction.

References

Edwards, A., Housley, W., Williams, M., Sloan, L., & Williams, M. (2013). Digital social research, social media and the sociological imagination: surrogacy, augmentation and re-orientation. International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 16(3), 245-260. doi: 10.1080/13645579.2013.774185

Quan-Haase, A. & Sloan, L. (forthcoming 2017). Introduction to the Handbook of Social Media Research Methods: Goals, Challenges and Innovations. In L. Sloan & A. Quan- Haase (Eds.), The Sage Handbook of Social Media Research Methods. London: SAGE.

Sloan, L., Morgan, J., Housley, W., Williams, M., Edwards, A., Burnap, P., & Rana, O. (2013). Knowing the Tweeters: Deriving Sociologi

...

Workshop Organizers
DM

dhiraj murthy

Associate Professor, The University of Texas at Austin
avatar for Anabel Quan-Haase

Anabel Quan-Haase

Professor, Western University
Looking forward to hearing about novel methods in the study of social media, new trends, and social activism. I am also curious about interdisciplinary teams and how they work. Any success stories, best practices or failures?
avatar for Luke Sloan

Luke Sloan

Deputy Director Social Data Science Lab, Cardiff University
Luke Sloan is a Senior Lecturer in Quantitative Methods and Deputy Director of the Social Data Science Lab at the School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University UK. Luke has worked on a range of projects investigating the use of Twitter data for understanding social phenomena covering... Read More →
avatar for Frauke Zeller

Frauke Zeller

Associate Professor, Ryerson University
I am the co-creator of hitchBOT!


Friday July 28, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:00

Workshop 1B: Networks for Newbies (PART 2)
THIS IS PART 2 OF THIS WORKSHOP, PLEASE MAKE SURE TO SIGN-UP FOR PART 1. 

Workshop Facilitator

Dr. Barry Wellman
, NetLab Network (Canada)

Workshop Details

This is a non-technical introduction to social network analysis. It describes the development for social network analysis, key concepts, and key substantive methods and findings. It is aimed at newcomers to the field, and those who have only seen social network analysis as a method.

Instructor’s Bio

Barry Wellman, FRSC is a Canadian-American sociologist and is the co-director of the Toronto-based international NetLab Network. His areas of research are community sociology, the Internet, human-computer interaction and social structure, as manifested in social networks in communities and organizations. His overarching interest is in the paradigm shift from group-centered relations to networked individualism. He has written or co-authored more than 300 articles, chapters, reports and books. Wellman was a professor at the Department of Sociology, University of Toronto for 46 years, from 1967 to 2013, including a five-year stint as S.D. Clark Professor.


Workshop Organizers
avatar for Barry Wellman

Barry Wellman

Co-Director, NetLab Network
I'm involved in studying Networked Individualism-how Torontonians incorporate digital media into their everyday social networks; and Networked Work and Research-how coworkers collaborate in multiple teams, often far-flung. I've co-authored the double-award winner Networked: The New... Read More →


Friday July 28, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

11:00

Workshop 1C: Text Analytics for Social Data Using DiscoverText & Sifter (PART 2)

THIS IS PART 2 OF THIS WORKSHOP, PLEASE MAKE SURE TO SIGN-UP FOR PART 1. 

Workshop Facilitator

Dr. Stu Shulman
, Texifter (USA)


Workshop Details

Participate in this workshop to learn how to build custom machine classifiers for sifting social media data. The topics covered include how to:

  • construct precise social data fetch queries,
  • use Boolean search on resulting archives,
  • filter on metadata or other project attributes,
  • count and set aside duplicates, cluster near-duplicates,
  • crowd source human coding,
  • measure inter-rater reliability,
  • adjudicate coder disagreements, and
  • build high quality word sense and topic disambiguation engines.

DiscoverText is designed specifically for collecting and cleaning up messy Twitter data streams. Use basic research measurement tools to improve human and machine performance classifying Twitter data over time. The workshop covers how to reach and substantiate inferences using a theoretical and applied model informed by a decade of interdisciplinary, National Science Foundation-funded research into the text classification problem.

Participants will learn how to apply “CoderRank” in machine-learning. Just as Google said not all web pages are created equal, links on some pages rank higher than others, Dr. Shulman argues not all human coders are created equal; the accuracy of observations by some coders on any task invariably rank higher than others. The major idea of the workshop is that when training machines for text analysis, greater reliance should be placed on the input of those humans most likely to create a valid observation. Texifter proposed a unique way to recursively validate, measure, and rank humans on trust and knowledge vectors, and called it CoderRank.

Instructor’s Bio

Dr. Stuart W. Shulman is founder & CEO of Texifter.  He was a Research Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the founding Director of the Qualitative Data Analysis Program (QDAP) at the University of Pittsburgh and at UMass Amherst. Dr. Shulman is Editor Emeritus of the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, the official journal of Information Technology & Politics section of the American Political Science Association.

 


Workshop Organizers
avatar for Stu Shulman

Stu Shulman

CEO, Texifter
Dr. Stuart W. Shulman is the founder and CEO of Texifter. Stu was formerly a UMass Amherst political science professor and the Vice President for Text Analytics at Vision Critical. Dr. Shulman is the sole inventor of the Coding Analysis Toolkit (CAT), an open source, Web-based text... Read More →


Friday July 28, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:00

Workshop 1D: Tracing mobile connections with digital traces: a multi-method approach (PART 2)

THIS IS PART 2 OF THIS WORKSHOP, PLEASE MAKE SURE TO SIGN-UP FOR PART 1. 

Workshop Facilitator

Dr. Jeffrey Boase
, Associate Professor in the Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology and the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto (Canada)
 


Workshop Details 

The first part of this workshop will review arguments and empirical findings regarding the role of mobile phone use in personal networks. The second part of the workshop will focus on discussing a newly developed multi-method approach to combining mobile calling and texting log data with traditional survey and interview techniques. This approach involves a system in which an online portal is used to customize the actions of a smartphone based data collection application. These actions include the collection of non-identifying calling and texting log data, on-screen survey questions, and dynamically drawing on log data to generate questions and stimuli for use during in-person interviews. After discussing this method we will have a hands-on exercise with the online portal and app. Respondents are encouraged to bring an Android phone to the workshop in order to fully participate in this exercise. 

Bio

Dr. Jeffrey Boase is an Associate Professor in the Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology and the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on the relationship between communication technology and personal networks. He is particularly interested in how emerging technologies such as smartphones and social media platforms may enable or hinder the transfer of information and support within personal networks. In recent years he has incorporated digital trace data into his project designs, merging it with more traditional survey and interview data.

 

 


Workshop Organizers
avatar for Jeffrey Boase

Jeffrey Boase

Associate Professor, University of Toronto


Friday July 28, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

12:30

Lunch (self-organized)

Friday July 28, 2017 12:30 - 14:00
Self-organized Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

14:00

Workshop 2A: Uncovering deep context in social media preferences: Analyzing social media use using free pile sort and UX methodologies
Workshop Facilitators

Dr. Jaigris Hodson
, Royal Roads University
Dr. Brian Traynor
, Mount Royal University
Dr. Gilbert Wilkes, Mount Royal University (Canada)

Workshop Details

Analyzing social media use using free pile sort and UX methodologies User-Centered Design (UCD) places strong emphasis on feedback from users early and often within the product development cycle. Having users of a product or service be involved with helping organize content, particularly navigational and labeling structures, early in the process is crucial for success. One UX tool used to collect information on the mental models of how users ‘see’ their content is Card Sorting. This hands-on workshop is designed to give you an understanding of the method and data analysis of this simple yet powerful research application. In Social Sciences we often triangulate through a variety of methods to tease out our understanding of complex situations. Where we can combine both qualitative and quantitative methods we can probe and tease out subtleties in research data. Card Sorting is a mixed method that allow us to examine user preferences.

The workshop will focus on the following questions:

  • Why UX tools/methods are research based and offer a mature portfolio of methodologies that can be applied in many areas
  • What are the parallels between anthropological Pile Sort and UX Card Sorting?
  • How do you conduct a Card Sort online?
  • How do you analyze, organize and leverage data from a Card Sort study?
  • What else can you do with the data from a Card Sort study?
  • What are the biggest challenges in using some UX tools in the Social Sciences?

The typical UX activity is structured in three parts:

a) Session introduction - participant background data

b) Usability test activity

c) Post-session experience - participant demographic data

This structure supports the collection of both structured and unstructured data. The normal considerations must be taken into account for sensitive data treatment and researcher bias.

Who should attend

This workshop will appeal to researchers with an interest in mixed-methods. Anyone interested in how UX researchers typically structure test activities with participants will gain insights on unmoderated data collection.

Are you involved in a research study where there are multiple viewpoints or complex alternatives? If so, then Card Sorting might be a technique for you to examine the relative strength of choices. Are your research participants distributed geographically and open to using a variety of technologies? The recruitment and data collection techniques/tools frequently used in UX might be just what you need. 


Workshop Organizers
avatar for Jaigris Hodson

Jaigris Hodson

Assistant Professor, Royal Roads University
Jaigris Hodson (B.A. Royal Roads University, M.A., Ph.D. York/Ryerson) is an Assistant Professor in Office of Interdisciplinary Studies at Royal Roads University. Her doctoral research focused on compiling and understanding the self-professed corporate identities of Facebook... Read More →
BT

Brian Traynor

Associate Prof. Information Design, Mount Royal University


Friday July 28, 2017 14:00 - 15:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

14:00

Workshop 2B: Charting Collections of Connections in Social Media: Creating Maps and Measures with NodeXL
Workshop Facilitator

Dr. Marc A. Smith, Chief Social Scientist, Connected Action Consulting Group

Pre-requisites:

 * Download and support site for "NodeXL Basic" - the network overview, discovery and exploration add-in for Excel.  If you can make a pie chart, you can now make a social media network map.

 

http://nodexl.codeplex.com

For background and resources related to NodeXL, please have a look at:

 * NodeXLGraphGallery: A collection of social media network visualizations, descriptions, and data sets for download. Also the download point for NodeXL Pro.

http://nodexlgraphgallery.org/Pages/Default.aspx

 * Connected Action Blog about social media, sociology, information visualization, and networks:

http://www.connectedaction.net



Workshop Details

Networks are a data structure commonly found in any social media service that allows populations to author collections of connections. The Social Media Research Foundation's NodeXL project makes analysis of social media networks accessible to most users of the Excel spreadsheet application.  With NodeXL, network charts become as easy to create as pie charts.  Recent research created by applying the tool to a range of social media networks has already revealed the variations in network structures present in online social spaces.  A review of the tool and images of Twitter, flickr, YouTube, Facebook and email networks will be presented. 

Description: We now live in a sea of tweets, posts, blogs, and updates coming from a significant fraction of the people in the connected world.  Our personal and professional relationships are now made up as much of texts, emails, phone calls, photos, videos, documents, slides, and game play as by face-to-face interactions.  Social media can be a bewildering stream of comments, a daunting fire hose of content.  With better tools and a few key concepts from the social sciences, the social media swarm of favorites, comments, tags, likes, ratings, updates and links can be brought into clearer focus to reveal key people, topics and sub-communities.  As more social interactions move through machine-readable data sets new insights and illustrations of human relationships and organizations become possible.  But new forms of data require new tools to collect, analyze, and communicate insights.  

The Social Media Research Foundation (http://www.smrfoundation.org), formed in 2010 to develop open tools and open data sets, and to foster open scholarship related to social media.  The Foundation's current focus is on creating and publishing tools that enable social media network analysis and visualization from widely used services like email, Twitter, Facebook, flickr, YouTube and the WWW. The Foundation has released the NodeXL project (http://nodexl.codeplex.com/), a spreadsheet add-in that supports "network overview discovery and exploration".  The tool fits inside your existing copy of Excel in Office (2007, 2010, 2013 and 2016) and makes creating a social network map similar to the process of making a pie chart.  

Using NodeXL, users can easily make a map of public social media conversations around topics that matter to them. Maps of the connections among the people who recently said the name of a product, brand or event can reveal key positions and clusters in the crowd.  Some people who talk about a topic are more in the "center" of the graph, they may be key influential members in the population.  NodeXL makes it a simple task to sort people in a population by their network location to find key people in core or bridge positions.  NodeXL supports the exploration of social media with import features that pull data from personal email indexes on the desktop, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, Facebook, Wikis, blogs and WWW hyper-links.  The tool allows non-programmers to quickly generate useful network statistics and metrics and create visualizations of network graphs. 

A book Analyzing Social Media Networks with NodeXL: Insights from a connected world is available from Morgan-Kaufmann.  The book provides an introduction to the history and core concepts of social network analysis along with a series of step-by-step instructions that illustrate the use of the key features of NodeXL.  The second half of the book is dedicated to chapters by a number of leading social media researchers that each focus on a single social media service and the networks it contains. Chapters on Twitter, email, YouTube, flickr, Facebook, Wikis, and the World Wide Web illustrate the network data structures that are common to all social media services.  

 A recent report co-authored with the Pew Research Center's Internet Project documents the discovery of the six basic forms of social media network structures present in social media platforms like Twitter.  The report, "Mapping Twitter Topic Networks: From Polarized Crowds to Community Clusters" provides a step by step guide to analyzing social media networks.

Pre-requisites:

For background and resources related to NodeXL, please have a look at:

 * NodeXLGraphGallery: A collection of social media network visualizations, descriptions, and data sets for download. Also the download point for NodeXL Pro.

http://nodexlgraphgallery.org/Pages/Default.aspx

 * Connected Action Blog about social media, sociology, information visualization, and networks:

http://www.connectedaction.net

 * Download and support site for "NodeXL Basic" - the network overview, discovery and exploration add-in for Excel.  If you can make a pie chart, you can now make a social media network map.

http://nodexl.codeplex.com

 * The Social Media Research Foundation creates NodeXL and fosters the creation of social media and network science scholarship:

http://www.smrfoundation.org/

 * Scholarly publications: NodeXL is used frequently in peer reviewed publications as shown by Google Scholar search results:

https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&q=nodexl

 * Recent press: Applying social media network maps to political and social topics:

 * Video: overview of NodeXL 

Personal Democracy Forum 2015: Picturing Online Crowds

http://bit.ly/1FGWq07 

Slides: http://www.slideshare.net/Marc_A_Smith/2015-pdfmarc-smithnode-xlsocial-media-sna

The Next Web 2014: Mapping social media networks

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5RonanIOF8

Slides: http://www.slideshare.net/Marc_A_Smith/2014-the-next-websmrfnode-xlsnasocial-media-networks

 Charting Collections of Connections 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwVvQhhLUqc

#NodeXL Exploring Twitter's Social Graph

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXLXHKnDi9s

San Francisco Online Community Meetup March 26

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCYpAmk_2-Y&

 * Slides: overview of the NodeXL project and its applications

https://www.slideshare.net/Marc_A_Smith/2016-socialmediaorg-marc-smithnodexlsocial-media-sna

Instructor’s Bio

Dr. Marc A. Smith
Chief Social Scientist
Connected Action Consulting Group

Marc@connectedaction.net  
http://www.connectedaction.nethttp://nodexl.codeplex.com

http://twitter.com/marc_smith
http://www.smrfoundation.org/

Marc Smith is a sociologist specializing in the social organization of online communities and computer mediated interaction. Smith leads the Connected Action consulting group and lives and works in Silicon Valley, California.  Smith co-founded and directs the Social Media Research Foundation (http://www.smrfoundation.org/), a non-profit devoted to open tools, data, and scholarship related to social media research.

Smith is the co-editor with Peter Kollock of Communities in Cyberspace (Routledge), a collection of essays exploring the ways identity; interaction and social order develop in online groups. Along with Derek Hansen and Ben Shneiderman, he is the co-author and editor of Analyzing Social Media Networks with NodeXL: Insights from a connected world, from Morgan-Kaufmann which is a guide to mapping connections created through computer-mediated interactions.

Smith's research focuses on computer-mediated collective action: the ways group dynamics change when they take place in and through social cyberspaces. Many "groups" in cyberspace produce public goods and organize themselves in the form of a commons (for related papers see: http://www.connectedaction.net/marc-smith/). Smith's goal is to visualize these social cyberspaces, mapping and measuring their structure, dynamics and life cycles. While at Microsoft Research, he founded the Community Technologies Group and led the development of the "Netscan" web application and data mining engine that allowed researchers studying Usenet newsgroups and related repositories of threaded conversations to get reports on the rates of posting, posters, crossposting, thread lengt

...

Workshop Organizers
avatar for Marc Smith

Marc Smith

Chief Social Scientist, Social Media Research Foundation
Networks, social networks, social media networks, NodeXL, SNA, data visualization, social media analysis


Friday July 28, 2017 14:00 - 15:30
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

14:00

Workshop 2C: Trust of News, Information and Users in the Digital Age
Workshop Facilitators 

Elizabeth Dubois, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication, University of Ottawa @lizdubois
William H. Dutton, Quello Professor and Director of the Quello Center, Michigan State University @BiIIDutton
Ed Greenspon, President and CEO of the Public Policy Forum, Ottawa, Canada @egreenspon @ppforumca
Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication, Human-Computer Interaction Lab, University of Connecticut ‪@anneohirsch
Craig Robertson, Doctoral Student, Media and Information, Michigan State University @CraigTRobertson 

Workshop Details

This workshop will begin a discussion about news and democracy in the digital age. A quick review of a report from Public Policy Forum serves as a spark for coordinated group brainstorming around research and policy needs. Focus will then turn to debate over studies that address aspects of these concerns, beginning with a cross-national online survey of Internet users and how they use search and social media to access information about politics. The discussion will then turn to a related study looks at how individuals access and learn from news on social media. These studies will be discussed individually and together – over Twitter (at #smtrust) and in the workshop – before turning to issues for policy and practice in Canada and worldwide, such as around social media, search, and digital media literacy. Breakout groups will formulate proposals for policy and practice that will be presented to the workshop in a final discussion section.

Part 1. Threats to the Future of News: a Canadian Perspective (Elizabeth Dubois and Ed Greenspon)

Canada’s Public Policy Forum produced a 2017 report, entitled ‘The Shattered Mirror’, which details the future of news and related policy in Canada. The report raises a number of major issues concerning news, democracy and trust in the digital age and provides a list of broad policy recommendations. This seems like an excellent place to begin our workshop: What are the major concerns over news and information in the digital age?

Participants will participate in guided small group discussion on key questions the report brings to light such as: What academic research is needed to further policy objectives? How might we implement Creative Commons licensing for the CBC? What should/could the government do to counter “fake news”? And are these the right priorities?

This early discussion will help set the tone for the rest of the workshop and encourage participants to share their own experiences as each project is presented.

References

Public Policy Forum, ‘The Shattered Mirror: News, Democracy and Trust in the Digital Age’, Ottawa, ON, Canada: Public Policy Forum. Available online at https://shatteredmirror.ca

Part 2. Search and Politics: Fake News, Filter Bubbles, and Echo Chambers (William Dutton, Elizabeth Dubois, and Craig Robertson)

Global debate over the impact of algorithms and search on shaping political opinions has increased following 2016 election results in Europe and the US. Powerful images of the Internet enabling access to a global treasure trove of information have shifted to worries over whether those who use search engines and social media are being fed inaccurate, false, or politically targeted information that distorts public opinion. There are serious questions over whether biases embedded in the algorithms that drive search engines and social media have major political consequences, such as creating filter bubbles or echo chambers. For example, do search engines and social media provide people with information that aligns with their beliefs and opinions or do they challenge them to consider countervailing perspectives? Most generally, the predominant concern is do these media have a major impact on public opinion and political viewpoints, and if so, for the better or worse.

This study addresses these issues by asking Internet users how they use search, social media, and other important media to get information about political candidates, issues, and politics generally, as well as what difference it makes for individuals participating in democratic processes. We conducted an online survey of Internet users in seven nations: Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain, and the US. Discussion will focus on whether this research can be used to identify those most vulnerable to fake news or bias in access, and what can be done to support them, ranging from media reform to digital media literacy.

References

Dutton, W. H. (2017), ‘Fake News, Echo Chambers and Filter Bubbles’, The Conversation, available online at: https://theconversation.com/fake-news-echo-chambers-and-filter-bubbles-underresearched-and-overhyped-76688

Dutton, W.H., Reisdorf, B. C., Dubois, E., Blank, G., Ahmad, S., and Robertson, C. (2017), ‘Search and Politics: The Uses and Impacts of Search in Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain, and the United States’, Quello Center Working Paper available online at: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2960697

Part 3. Processing News (Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch)

Internet users are increasingly getting their news from social media, and they are also doing so more passively. Given the growing “news-finds-me” perception on social media, questions arise about how social media users assess the credibility of news content and what they learn from it. A collection of studies shows that while social media users actively engage with news content on social media platforms, this does not translate to greater knowledge about current events. Furthermore, users may not differentiate between sources when judging the credibility of news content.

The primary study discussed in this workshop is built on this work and experimentally tests how Facebook users assess and learn from news content in Facebook news posts where multiple media and friend sources must be considered. The results show that source effects on credibility as well as learning depend heavily on a user’s involvement in the content.

Discussion of this research will focus on the implications of this growing body of research that shows a lack of beneficial effects of social media news exposure on knowledge. Participants will share their own social media experience and expertise to brainstorm and compile a shareable guide on: 1) what user and technology elements may contribute to the disconnect between social media use and current events understanding, 2) what role social media should have in one’s engagement with current events, and 3) what actions users can take to use these media more meaningfully for their news consumption.

Reference

Oeldorf-Hirsch, A., & DeVoss, C. (2017, May). Processing layered news sources on Facebook: Effects on credibility and learning. Presented at the 67th annual conference of the International Communication Association (ICA), San Diego, CA.

Part 4. Directions for Research, Policy, and Practice (Ed Greenspon)

In the final segment of this workshop we return to our initial brainstorming groups to review the day’s insights in terms of next steps for research and policy. We then discuss broad questions as a group.

Some guiding questions include: What are the missing pieces in our understanding of the dynamics of individual and collective exposure to news and information about politics? What are the priorities for research? What are the major implications for policy and practice? Is panic over contemporary issues leading to inappropriate initiatives for governance, policy and practice? Are there constructive steps to support news and information for democracy in the digital age, such as around digital media literacy?

 


Workshop Organizers
avatar for Elizabeth Dubois

Elizabeth Dubois

Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa
avatar for William Dutton

William Dutton

Quello Professor, Quello Center, MSU, USA
My colleagues and I recently completed a study of search and politics, and I continue to work on my concept of The Fifth Estate. Happy to speak with anyone about any aspect of Internet studies, that very much includes study of social media and society.
avatar for Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch

Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch

Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut
CR

Craig Robertson

Student, MSU


Friday July 28, 2017 14:00 - 15:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

14:00

Workshop 2D: Hypothesis Testing with Online Network Data: Introduction to Exponential Random Graph Modelling (ERGM)

Workshop Facilitator

Anatoliy Gruzd, PhD, Ryerson University, Canada
Deena Abul Fottouh, Ph.D, McMaster University, Canada

Prerequisites: 

  • This workshop is for researchers who are familiar with Social Network Analysis (SNA). If you have not used SNA in your work before, please take Workshop 1B "Network for Newbies" offered in the morning.  
  • Knowledge of R is preferred but not required. If you don't have R and RStudio pre-installed on your laptop, you should be able to follow the workshop steps using a web-based version of R. 

Workshop Details

Participants will learn how to use SNA to analyze online communication networks. This part will also focus on how to use R package called statnet to perform hypothesis testing using Exponential Random Graph Modelling (ERGM). In particular, participants will learn how to use ERMG to test whether there is a tendency of online participants to connect to other users based on a common characteristic such as gender or their location.

Instructor’s Bio

Dr. Anatoliy Gruzd is a Canada Research Chair in Social Media Data Stewardship, Associate Professor at the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University (Canada) and Director of the Social Media Lab. He is also a co-editor of a multidisciplinary journal on Big Data and Society published by Sage and a co-editor of a special issue on Measuring Influence in Social Media for American Behavioral Scientist and a special issue on Understanding Online Communities for Information, Communication & Society. His research initiatives explore how the advent of social media is changing the ways in which people communicate, collaborate and disseminate information and how these changes impact the social, economic and political norms and structures of modern society.

Dr. Deena Abul Fottouh has recently finished her PhD in sociology at McMaster University. She is a holder of the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship for her research on Twitter networks of the activists of the Egyptian revolution. Deena’s research interests are in digital activism, computational sociology, social movements, and political sociology. She specializes in social network analysis, especially online networks. In her dissertation, Deena studied the evolution of Twitter networks of activists of the 2011 Egyptian revolution, and the turn of the movement from solidarity to schism. During her time at McMaster, Deena has travelled many times to the United States to receive extensive training in methods of social network analysis and scraping online data. She has presented her work in many international conferences of social network analysis. Her interest in digital activism has earned her a fellowship at the Sherman Centre for Digital Scholarship at McMaster University. Before joining McMaster, Deena has been working as a Socio-economic Research Specialist with the United Nations Development Programme. 


Workshop Organizers
avatar for Deena Abul Fottouh

Deena Abul Fottouh

Postdoc, McMaster University
avatar for Anatoliy Gruzd

Anatoliy Gruzd

Associate Professor, Ryerson University
Canada Research Chair in Social Media Data Stewardship, Director of Research at the Social Media Lab (http://SocialMediaLab.ca/), Associate Professor at the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University


Friday July 28, 2017 14:00 - 15:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:30

Coffee Break
Friday July 28, 2017 15:30 - 16:00
TRS 1-148 & 1-150 TRSM Commons - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

16:00

Workshop 2A: Uncovering deep context in social media preferences: Analyzing social media use using free pile sort and UX methodologies (PART 2)
THIS IS PART 2 OF THIS WORKSHOP, PLEASE MAKE SURE TO SIGN-UP FOR PART 1. 

Workshop Facilitators

Dr. Jaigris Hodson
, Royal Roads University
Dr. Brian Traynor
, Mount Royal University
Dr. Gilbert Wilkes, Mount Royal University (Canada)

Workshop Details

Analyzing social media use using free pile sort and UX methodologies User-Centered Design (UCD) places strong emphasis on feedback from users early and often within the product development cycle. Having users of a product or service be involved with helping organize content, particularly navigational and labeling structures, early in the process is crucial for success. One UX tool used to collect information on the mental models of how users ‘see’ their content is Card Sorting. This hands-on workshop is designed to give you an understanding of the method and data analysis of this simple yet powerful research application. In Social Sciences we often triangulate through a variety of methods to tease out our understanding of complex situations. Where we can combine both qualitative and quantitative methods we can probe and tease out subtleties in research data. Card Sorting is a mixed method that allow us to examine user preferences.

The workshop will focus on the following questions:

  • Why UX tools/methods are research based and offer a mature portfolio of methodologies that can be applied in many areas
  • What are the parallels between anthropological Pile Sort and UX Card Sorting?
  • How do you conduct a Card Sort online?
  • How do you analyze, organize and leverage data from a Card Sort study?
  • What else can you do with the data from a Card Sort study?
  • What are the biggest challenges in using some UX tools in the Social Sciences?

The typical UX activity is structured in three parts:

a) Session introduction - participant background data

b) Usability test activity

c) Post-session experience - participant demographic data

This structure supports the collection of both structured and unstructured data. The normal considerations must be taken into account for sensitive data treatment and researcher bias.

Who should attend

This workshop will appeal to researchers with an interest in mixed-methods. Anyone interested in how UX researchers typically structure test activities with participants will gain insights on unmoderated data collection.

Are you involved in a research study where there are multiple viewpoints or complex alternatives? If so, then Card Sorting might be a technique for you to examine the relative strength of choices. Are your research participants distributed geographically and open to using a variety of technologies? The recruitment and data collection techniques/tools frequently used in UX might be just what you need.


Workshop Organizers
avatar for Jaigris Hodson

Jaigris Hodson

Assistant Professor, Royal Roads University
Jaigris Hodson (B.A. Royal Roads University, M.A., Ph.D. York/Ryerson) is an Assistant Professor in Office of Interdisciplinary Studies at Royal Roads University. Her doctoral research focused on compiling and understanding the self-professed corporate identities of Facebook... Read More →
BT

Brian Traynor

Associate Prof. Information Design, Mount Royal University


Friday July 28, 2017 16:00 - 17:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

16:00

Workshop 2B: Charting Collections of Connections in Social Media: Creating Maps and Measures with NodeXL (PART 2)
THIS IS PART 2 OF THIS WORKSHOP, PLEASE MAKE SURE TO SIGN-UP FOR PART 1. 

Workshop Facilitator

Dr. Marc A. Smith, Chief Social Scientist, Connected Action Consulting Group


Pre-requisites:

 * Download and support site for "NodeXL Basic" - the network overview, discovery and exploration add-in for Excel.  If you can make a pie chart, you can now make a social media network map.

 

http://nodexl.codeplex.com

For background and resources related to NodeXL, please have a look at:

 * NodeXLGraphGallery: A collection of social media network visualizations, descriptions, and data sets for download. Also the download point for NodeXL Pro.

http://nodexlgraphgallery.org/Pages/Default.aspx

 * Connected Action Blog about social media, sociology, information visualization, and networks:

http://www.connectedaction.net

 



Workshop Details

Networks are a data structure commonly found in any social media service that allows populations to author collections of connections. The Social Media Research Foundation's NodeXL project makes analysis of social media networks accessible to most users of the Excel spreadsheet application.  With NodeXL, network charts become as easy to create as pie charts.  Recent research created by applying the tool to a range of social media networks has already revealed the variations in network structures present in online social spaces.  A review of the tool and images of Twitter, flickr, YouTube, Facebook and email networks will be presented. 

Description: We now live in a sea of tweets, posts, blogs, and updates coming from a significant fraction of the people in the connected world.  Our personal and professional relationships are now made up as much of texts, emails, phone calls, photos, videos, documents, slides, and game play as by face-to-face interactions.  Social media can be a bewildering stream of comments, a daunting fire hose of content.  With better tools and a few key concepts from the social sciences, the social media swarm of favorites, comments, tags, likes, ratings, updates and links can be brought into clearer focus to reveal key people, topics and sub-communities.  As more social interactions move through machine-readable data sets new insights and illustrations of human relationships and organizations become possible.  But new forms of data require new tools to collect, analyze, and communicate insights.  

The Social Media Research Foundation (http://www.smrfoundation.org), formed in 2010 to develop open tools and open data sets, and to foster open scholarship related to social media.  The Foundation's current focus is on creating and publishing tools that enable social media network analysis and visualization from widely used services like email, Twitter, Facebook, flickr, YouTube and the WWW. The Foundation has released the NodeXL project (http://nodexl.codeplex.com/), a spreadsheet add-in that supports "network overview discovery and exploration".  The tool fits inside your existing copy of Excel in Office (2007, 2010, 2013 and 2016) and makes creating a social network map similar to the process of making a pie chart.  

Using NodeXL, users can easily make a map of public social media conversations around topics that matter to them. Maps of the connections among the people who recently said the name of a product, brand or event can reveal key positions and clusters in the crowd.  Some people who talk about a topic are more in the "center" of the graph, they may be key influential members in the population.  NodeXL makes it a simple task to sort people in a population by their network location to find key people in core or bridge positions.  NodeXL supports the exploration of social media with import features that pull data from personal email indexes on the desktop, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, Facebook, Wikis, blogs and WWW hyper-links.  The tool allows non-programmers to quickly generate useful network statistics and metrics and create visualizations of network graphs. 

A book Analyzing Social Media Networks with NodeXL: Insights from a connected world is available from Morgan-Kaufmann.  The book provides an introduction to the history and core concepts of social network analysis along with a series of step-by-step instructions that illustrate the use of the key features of NodeXL.  The second half of the book is dedicated to chapters by a number of leading social media researchers that each focus on a single social media service and the networks it contains. Chapters on Twitter, email, YouTube, flickr, Facebook, Wikis, and the World Wide Web illustrate the network data structures that are common to all social media services.  

 A recent report co-authored with the Pew Research Center's Internet Project documents the discovery of the six basic forms of social media network structures present in social media platforms like Twitter.  The report, "Mapping Twitter Topic Networks: From Polarized Crowds to Community Clusters" provides a step by step guide to analyzing social media networks.

Pre-requisites:

For background and resources related to NodeXL, please have a look at:

 * NodeXLGraphGallery: A collection of social media network visualizations, descriptions, and data sets for download. Also the download point for NodeXL Pro.

http://nodexlgraphgallery.org/Pages/Default.aspx

 * Connected Action Blog about social media, sociology, information visualization, and networks:

http://www.connectedaction.net

 * Download and support site for "NodeXL Basic" - the network overview, discovery and exploration add-in for Excel.  If you can make a pie chart, you can now make a social media network map.

http://nodexl.codeplex.com

 * The Social Media Research Foundation creates NodeXL and fosters the creation of social media and network science scholarship:

http://www.smrfoundation.org/

 * Scholarly publications: NodeXL is used frequently in peer reviewed publications as shown by Google Scholar search results:

https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&q=nodexl

 * Recent press: Applying social media network maps to political and social topics:

 * Video: overview of NodeXL 

Personal Democracy Forum 2015: Picturing Online Crowds

http://bit.ly/1FGWq07 

Slides: http://www.slideshare.net/Marc_A_Smith/2015-pdfmarc-smithnode-xlsocial-media-sna

The Next Web 2014: Mapping social media networks

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5RonanIOF8

Slides: http://www.slideshare.net/Marc_A_Smith/2014-the-next-websmrfnode-xlsnasocial-media-networks

 Charting Collections of Connections 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwVvQhhLUqc

#NodeXL Exploring Twitter's Social Graph

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXLXHKnDi9s

San Francisco Online Community Meetup March 26

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCYpAmk_2-Y&

 * Slides: overview of the NodeXL project and its applications

https://www.slideshare.net/Marc_A_Smith/2016-socialmediaorg-marc-smithnodexlsocial-media-sna

Instructor’s Bio

Dr. Marc A. Smith
Chief Social Scientist
Connected Action Consulting Group

Marc@connectedaction.net  
http://www.connectedaction.nethttp://nodexl.codeplex.com

http://twitter.com/marc_smith
http://www.smrfoundation.org/

Marc Smith is a sociologist specializing in the social organization of online communities and computer mediated interaction. Smith leads the Connected Action consulting group and lives and works in Silicon Valley, California.  Smith co-founded and directs the Social Media Research Foundation (http://www.smrfoundation.org/), a non-profit devoted to open tools, data, and scholarship related to social media research.

Smith is the co-editor with Peter Kollock of Communities in Cyberspace (Routledge), a collection of essays exploring the ways identity; interaction and social order develop in online groups. Along with Derek Hansen and Ben Shneiderman, he is the co-author and editor of Analyzing Social Media Networks with NodeXL: Insights from a connected world, from Morgan-Kaufmann which is a guide to mapping connections created through computer-mediated interactions.

Smith's research focuses on computer-mediated collective action: the ways group dynamics change when they take place in and through social cyberspaces. Many "groups" in cyberspace produce public goods and organize themselves in the form of a commons (for related papers see: http://www.connectedaction.net/marc-smith/). Smith's goal is to visualize these social cyberspaces, mapping and measuring their structure, dynamics and life cycles. While at Microsoft Research, he founded the Community Technologies Group and led the development of the "Netscan" web application and data mining engine that allowed researchers studying Usenet newsgroups and related repositories of threaded convers

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Workshop Organizers
avatar for Marc Smith

Marc Smith

Chief Social Scientist, Social Media Research Foundation
Networks, social networks, social media networks, NodeXL, SNA, data visualization, social media analysis


Friday July 28, 2017 16:00 - 17:30
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

16:00

Workshop 2C: Trust of News, Information and Users in the Digital Age (PART 2)
THIS IS PART 2 OF THIS WORKSHOP, PLEASE MAKE SURE TO SIGN-UP FOR PART 1. 

Workshop Facilitators
 

Elizabeth Dubois, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication, University of Ottawa @lizdubois
William H. Dutton, Quello Professor and Director of the Quello Center, Michigan State University @BiIIDutton
Ed Greenspon, President and CEO of the Public Policy Forum, Ottawa, Canada @egreenspon @ppforumca
Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication, Human-Computer Interaction Lab, University of Connecticut ‪@anneohirsch
Craig Robertson, Doctoral Student, Media and Information, Michigan State University @CraigTRobertson 

Workshop Details

This workshop will begin a discussion about news and democracy in the digital age. A quick review of a report from Public Policy Forum serves as a spark for coordinated group brainstorming around research and policy needs. Focus will then turn to debate over studies that address aspects of these concerns, beginning with a cross-national online survey of Internet users and how they use search and social media to access information about politics. The discussion will then turn to a related study looks at how individuals access and learn from news on social media. These studies will be discussed individually and together – over Twitter (at #smtrust) and in the workshop – before turning to issues for policy and practice in Canada and worldwide, such as around social media, search, and digital media literacy. Breakout groups will formulate proposals for policy and practice that will be presented to the workshop in a final discussion section.

Part 1. Threats to the Future of News: a Canadian Perspective (Elizabeth Dubois and Ed Greenspon)

Canada’s Public Policy Forum produced a 2017 report, entitled ‘The Shattered Mirror’, which details the future of news and related policy in Canada. The report raises a number of major issues concerning news, democracy and trust in the digital age and provides a list of broad policy recommendations. This seems like an excellent place to begin our workshop: What are the major concerns over news and information in the digital age?

Participants will participate in guided small group discussion on key questions the report brings to light such as: What academic research is needed to further policy objectives? How might we implement Creative Commons licensing for the CBC? What should/could the government do to counter “fake news”? And are these the right priorities?

This early discussion will help set the tone for the rest of the workshop and encourage participants to share their own experiences as each project is presented.

References

Public Policy Forum, ‘The Shattered Mirror: News, Democracy and Trust in the Digital Age’, Ottawa, ON, Canada: Public Policy Forum. Available online at https://shatteredmirror.ca

Part 2. Search and Politics: Fake News, Filter Bubbles, and Echo Chambers (William Dutton, Elizabeth Dubois, and Craig Robertson)

Global debate over the impact of algorithms and search on shaping political opinions has increased following 2016 election results in Europe and the US. Powerful images of the Internet enabling access to a global treasure trove of information have shifted to worries over whether those who use search engines and social media are being fed inaccurate, false, or politically targeted information that distorts public opinion. There are serious questions over whether biases embedded in the algorithms that drive search engines and social media have major political consequences, such as creating filter bubbles or echo chambers. For example, do search engines and social media provide people with information that aligns with their beliefs and opinions or do they challenge them to consider countervailing perspectives? Most generally, the predominant concern is do these media have a major impact on public opinion and political viewpoints, and if so, for the better or worse.

This study addresses these issues by asking Internet users how they use search, social media, and other important media to get information about political candidates, issues, and politics generally, as well as what difference it makes for individuals participating in democratic processes. We conducted an online survey of Internet users in seven nations: Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain, and the US. Discussion will focus on whether this research can be used to identify those most vulnerable to fake news or bias in access, and what can be done to support them, ranging from media reform to digital media literacy.

References

Dutton, W. H. (2017), ‘Fake News, Echo Chambers and Filter Bubbles’, The Conversation, available online at: https://theconversation.com/fake-news-echo-chambers-and-filter-bubbles-underresearched-and-overhyped-76688

Dutton, W.H., Reisdorf, B. C., Dubois, E., Blank, G., Ahmad, S., and Robertson, C. (2017), ‘Search and Politics: The Uses and Impacts of Search in Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain, and the United States’, Quello Center Working Paper available online at: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2960697

Part 3. Processing News (Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch)

Internet users are increasingly getting their news from social media, and they are also doing so more passively. Given the growing “news-finds-me” perception on social media, questions arise about how social media users assess the credibility of news content and what they learn from it. A collection of studies shows that while social media users actively engage with news content on social media platforms, this does not translate to greater knowledge about current events. Furthermore, users may not differentiate between sources when judging the credibility of news content.

The primary study discussed in this workshop is built on this work and experimentally tests how Facebook users assess and learn from news content in Facebook news posts where multiple media and friend sources must be considered. The results show that source effects on credibility as well as learning depend heavily on a user’s involvement in the content.

Discussion of this research will focus on the implications of this growing body of research that shows a lack of beneficial effects of social media news exposure on knowledge. Participants will share their own social media experience and expertise to brainstorm and compile a shareable guide on: 1) what user and technology elements may contribute to the disconnect between social media use and current events understanding, 2) what role social media should have in one’s engagement with current events, and 3) what actions users can take to use these media more meaningfully for their news consumption.

Reference

Oeldorf-Hirsch, A., & DeVoss, C. (2017, May). Processing layered news sources on Facebook: Effects on credibility and learning. Presented at the 67th annual conference of the International Communication Association (ICA), San Diego, CA.

Part 4. Directions for Research, Policy, and Practice (Ed Greenspon)

In the final segment of this workshop we return to our initial brainstorming groups to review the day’s insights in terms of next steps for research and policy. We then discuss broad questions as a group.

Some guiding questions include: What are the missing pieces in our understanding of the dynamics of individual and collective exposure to news and information about politics? What are the priorities for research? What are the major implications for policy and practice? Is panic over contemporary issues leading to inappropriate initiatives for governance, policy and practice? Are there constructive steps to support news and information for democracy in the digital age, such as around digital media literacy?


Workshop Organizers
avatar for Elizabeth Dubois

Elizabeth Dubois

Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa
avatar for William Dutton

William Dutton

Quello Professor, Quello Center, MSU, USA
My colleagues and I recently completed a study of search and politics, and I continue to work on my concept of The Fifth Estate. Happy to speak with anyone about any aspect of Internet studies, that very much includes study of social media and society.
avatar for Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch

Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch

Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut
CR

Craig Robertson

Student, MSU


Friday July 28, 2017 16:00 - 17:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

16:00

Workshop 2D: Hypothesis Testing with Online Network Data: Introduction to Exponential Random Graph Modelling (ERGM) (PART 2)

THIS IS PART 2 OF THIS WORKSHOP, PLEASE MAKE SURE TO SIGN-UP FOR PART 1. 

Workshop Facilitator

Anatoliy Gruzd, PhD, Ryerson University, Canada
Deena Abul Fottouh, Ph.D, McMaster University, Canada

Prerequisites: 

  • This workshop is for researchers who are familiar with Social Network Analysis (SNA). If you have not used SNA in your work before, please take Workshop 1B "Network for Newbies" offered in the morning.  
  • Knowledge of R is preferred but not required. If you don't have R and RStudio pre-installed on your laptop, you should be able to follow the workshop steps using a web-based version of R. 

Workshop Details

Participants will learn how to use SNA to analyze online communication networks. This part will also focus on how to use R package called statnet to perform hypothesis testing using Exponential Random Graph Modelling (ERGM). In particular, participants will learn how to use ERMG to test whether there is a tendency of online participants to connect to other users based on a common characteristic such as gender or their location.

Instructor’s Bio

Dr. Anatoliy Gruzd is a Canada Research Chair in Social Media Data Stewardship, Associate Professor at the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University (Canada) and Director of the Social Media Lab. He is also a co-editor of a multidisciplinary journal on Big Data and Society published by Sage and a co-editor of a special issue on Measuring Influence in Social Media for American Behavioral Scientist and a special issue on Understanding Online Communities for Information, Communication & Society. His research initiatives explore how the advent of social media is changing the ways in which people communicate, collaborate and disseminate information and how these changes impact the social, economic and political norms and structures of modern society.

Dr. Deena Abul Fottouh has recently finished her PhD in sociology at McMaster University. She is a holder of the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship for her research on Twitter networks of the activists of the Egyptian revolution. Deena’s research interests are in digital activism, computational sociology, social movements, and political sociology. She specializes in social network analysis, especially online networks. In her dissertation, Deena studied the evolution of Twitter networks of activists of the 2011 Egyptian revolution, and the turn of the movement from solidarity to schism. During her time at McMaster, Deena has travelled many times to the United States to receive extensive training in methods of social network analysis and scraping online data. She has presented her work in many international conferences of social network analysis. Her interest in digital activism has earned her a fellowship at the Sherman Centre for Digital Scholarship at McMaster University. Before joining McMaster, Deena has been working as a Socio-economic Research Specialist with the United Nations Development Programme. 

 


Workshop Organizers
avatar for Deena Abul Fottouh

Deena Abul Fottouh

Postdoc, McMaster University
avatar for Anatoliy Gruzd

Anatoliy Gruzd

Associate Professor, Ryerson University
Canada Research Chair in Social Media Data Stewardship, Director of Research at the Social Media Lab (http://SocialMediaLab.ca/), Associate Professor at the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University


Friday July 28, 2017 16:00 - 17:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

17:30

Tour of Ryerson Social Media Lab (Optional)
Come to learn more about our various projects and tools that we develop for social media researchers!

Direction:
Meet at the conference registration desk on the 7th floor of the TRSM building. 

If you are running late, please feel free to come directly to the lab at:
10 Dundas St East, 10th Floor, Suite 1002 (Cineplex Theatre Building)
When you enter 10 Dundas, look for the elevator bank (marked as Office Tower) next to the Starbucks Coffee on the 1st floor. Take the elevator to the 10th floor, our office suite #1002 will be on the right. 

Friday July 28, 2017 17:30 - 18:00
Social Media Lab @ Ryerson University 10 Dundas St East, 10th Floor, Suite 1002, Toronto, ON M5B 0A1

17:30

Dinner (self-organized)
Friday July 28, 2017 17:30 - 20:00
Self-organized Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

20:00

Social at ‘Spring Sushi’ (Beer & Wine Reception)

 

Location: 10 Dundas St East (Cineplex building corner of Yonge & Dundas St. This is also the same building where the Social Media Lab is located.) *

*When you enter 10 Dundas East, take escalators up the 4th floor or look for the elevator bank (marked as Office Tower) next to Starbucks on the 1st floor. 


Friday July 28, 2017 20:00 - 23:00
Spring Sushi 10 Dundas St. East 4th Floor
 
Saturday, July 29
 

08:30

Registration & Coffee Reception
Join us for morning coffee and fresh pastries!

Saturday July 29, 2017 08:30 - 09:00
TRS 1-148 & 1-150 TRSM Commons - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

09:00

Introduction & Keynote: Lee Rainie-The Reckoning for Social Media

Lee Rainie, director of internet, science, and technology research at the Pew Research Center, will discuss new research about how citizens are trying to navigate the  challenging world of “fake news” and “truthiness” on social media. He will look at how people are trying to adjust to the turmoil over the impact of social media on political deliberation and what this means about the concepts of “expertise” and “trust".


Speakers
avatar for Lee Rainie

Lee Rainie

Director, Pew Research Center
Lee Rainie is the director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, which has studied the social impact of digital technologies since 2000. He gives several dozen speeches a year to government officials, media leaders, scholars and students, technology executives... Read More →


Saturday July 29, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
TRS 2-166 -8th Floor Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

10:30

Coffee Break
Saturday July 29, 2017 10:30 - 11:00
TRS 1-148 & 1-150 TRSM Commons - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

11:00

Session 1A: Influencers
Moderators
avatar for Alicia Wanless

Alicia Wanless

Director of Strategic Communications, SecDev Foundation
Alicia researches how we shape — and are shaped — by a changing information space. As the Director of Strategic Communications at The SecDev Foundation, Alicia develops campaigns and strategies for engaging beneficiaries in outreach and behavioural change. Her work includes developing... Read More →

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

11:00

Session 1B: Theories & Methods
Moderators
BH

Bernie Hogan

Senior Research Fellow, University of Oxford
Dr Bernie Hogan is a Research Fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute, a department at the University of Oxford. His work sits in between social theory and methodological advances using big data. Concerning theory, Bernie’s work focuses on the ‘exhibitional approach’ and third... Read More →

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:00

Session 1C: Politics I
Moderators
avatar for Priya Kumar

Priya Kumar

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Social Media Lab, Ryerson University
@link_priya

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:00

Session 1D: Sharing Culture
Moderators
avatar for Caroline Haythornthwaite

Caroline Haythornthwaite

Professor, Syracuse University

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

11:01

Call To Retweet: Negotiated Diffusion Of Strategic Political Messages [FULL]
Authors: Jeff Hemsley, Sikana Tanupabrungsun and Bryan Semaan

Abstract: Twitter allows political candidates to broadcast messages directly to the public, some of which spread virally and potentially reach new audiences and supporters. During the 2014 U.S. gubernatorial election, 74 candidates posted 20,580 tweets, of which, 10,946 were retweeted a total of 139,315 times. Using content analysis, automated classification and regression analysis, we show that actors with different levels of network influence tend to promote different types of election content, but that the convergence of their choices and actions lead to information flows that reach the largest audiences. We also show that actors with middle-level influence, in terms of the number of followers they have, tend to be the most influential in the diffusion process. Our work provides empirical support for the theoretical framework of negotiated diffusion, which suggests that information flows are the result of the convergence of top-down forces (structures and powerful gatekeepers) and bottom-up forces (collective sharing of actors with varying degrees of influence).

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

11:01

Exploring The Perception Of Influencers Vs. Traditional Celebrities: Are Social Media Stars A New Type Of Endorser? [WIP]
Authors: Jan-Frederik Gräve

Abstract: The growing popularity of social media networks enables more and more individuals to acquire large audiences of up to several million people on these platforms. Companies are starting to recognize this potential especially for young target groups and hire these so-called influencers as endorsers in social media and sometimes even instead of traditional celebrities in corporate advertising. Therefore, the question arises whether there is a difference in perception between these two types of endorsers and if so, which moderators influence these perceptions. In the present study we explore consumers’ general perception of social media influencers compared to traditional celebrities. We conduct an online survey with 590 respondents who were asked to rate 14 influencers and traditional celebrities in pairwise comparisons regarding their similarity. We apply multidimensional scaling (MDS) and find substantial differences in perceptions between the two groups. Additionally, we apply property fitting with evaluations regarding six different characteristics determining endorser effectiveness. While in total traditional celebrities are evaluated more favorable, this difference diminishes for high levels of familiarity and even reverses for perceived trustworthiness and similarity to oneself. The results indicate that managers should carefully distinguish between influencers and traditional celebrities for endorsements, as systematic differences in perceptions between the groups are likely to have an impact on endorser effectiveness. Further research is needed to investigate which moderators (e.g. advertising type, product category) influence the perception and subsequently the endorsement effectiveness of the two types of endorsers.

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

11:01

How Celebrities Feed Tweeples With Personal And Promotional Tweets [WIP]
Authors: Sanchari Das, Javon Goard and Dakota Murray

Abstract: In contemporary United States culture, celebrities compete for attention and publicize their work through social media tools. Twitter is a popular platform that celebrities use to print a wide range of content, however little is known about the potency of these different types of content to draw audience attention and participation. In this paper, we outline a scheme for classifying content created by celebrity users on Twitter and analyze the audience engagement to these diverse types of tweets. We find that different types of content produce different levels of audience engagement and that celebrity’s everyday usage of Twitter (selfies, photos of travels, humor, etc.) produces the most engagement, followed by self-endorsement and commentary about society. But these patterns vary slightly between celebrities, and audiences are not identical in their response to the content. We likewise find that there is some other source of unexplained variation, likely resulting from Twitter’s recommendation algorithms.

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

11:01

Measured Beauty: Exploring The Aesthetics Of Instagram’s Fashion Influencers [WIP]
Authors: Emily Hund

Abstract: This paper draws upon a sample of Instagram images posted by the fashion industry’s top “digital influencers” to explore what kinds of visuality succeeds in a social media environment increasingly dominated by metrics and commercialization. It argues that influential beauty on Instagram is “measured” in two ways: it is quantified and delivered to advertisers, and it is non-threatening. This dual nature allows influencers’ Instagram feeds to become useful spaces onto which a range of aspirations can be projected and new technologies for monetization can be tested.

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

11:01

Free Pile Sort As A Method To Understand Gender Differences: An Ecological Model Of Social Media Use [WIP]
Authors: Jaigris Hodson, Brian Traynor and Gilbert Wilkes

Abstract: This pilot study looks at a novel methodology that helps to understand how people choose which social platform to use. Beginning with the assumption that affordances alone cannot explain differences in social media platform choice, we propose an ecological model to understand the differences between social media platform choice by gender. We propose that a free pile sort method offers an opportunity to understand influences at the micro, meso, and macro levels of the ecological model that may be subtle and difficult to gage across different social networks using other approaches. We show, in a pilot study, the ways this method reveals fine distinctions in the way male identified persons vs. female identified persons think about social media platforms which may help us explain trends in use.

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Rethinking Emotional Desensitization To Violence: Methodological And Theoretical Insights From Social Media Data [WIP]
Authors: Jianing Li, Devin Conathan and Ceri Hughes

Abstract: One path of gaining insights from Internet is to revisit traditional theories through novel methodology it fosters. The current study applies computerized linguistic analysis to study emotional desensitization towards violence through Twitter posts, which makes twofold contributions. First, the computational method overcomes the limitation of laboratory and cross-sectional survey approaches. Longitudinal effect of desensitization, which were unexamined or indirectly inferred by previous studies, could now be observed and analyzed directly without artificial inference. Second, the findings expand the previous unified conceptualization of emotional desensitization. People show significant decrease in disgust, sadness, and anger, yet notable increase in anxiety towards gun violence during 2012-2015, despite an overall decrease in the aggregation of above negative emotions. The results call for more careful conceptualization of emotional desensitization, and how methodological improvements supported by social media data can help deepen understanding of desensitization theory is discussed.

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

The ‘Paradigm Clash’ In Digital Labor Literature: Reconciling Critical Theory And Interpretive Approach To Empirical Research [WIP]
Authors: Olga Rodak and Karolina Mikołajewska-Zając

Abstract: ‘Digital labor’ became an umbrella term for the stream of research dealing with ‘users’ participation in the digital culture.’ It critically frames social media participation within a wider political economy of the Internet, where it is captured and translated into value for platform providers and powerful organizations. Though accurately adding critical interpretation to the discussion on this phenomenon, ‘digital labor’ theory does not provide sufficient methodological guidelines for social research. This remark applies especially to the problem of inclusion of so called ‘micro-perspective’ in theory-development, that is, social actors’ experience and perception. After performing the pilot literature study, we found that this challenge is recognized by the majority of scholars conducting empirical research in the spirit of ‘digital labor,’ however, there is little consent of how it could be solved. We argue that this problem may be reframed as an intra-disciplinary ‘paradigm clash’ – the incommensurability of the critical and the interpretive tradition in social science. We collected insights from research papers and call for conceptualizations that will inform empirical researcher of how to involve ‘micro-perspective’ while building the ‘digital labor’ theory.

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Twitter Issue Response Hashtags As Affordances For Momentary Connectedness [FULL]
Authors: Chamil Rathnayake and Daniel Suthers

Abstract: Online activity is commonly conceptualized in social media studies using theoretical frameworks defined for offline contexts, such as public sphere, publics, and communities. Although this approach has its merits, especially in terms of providing theoretical foundations to describe new phenomena, this approach limits conceptualization of online activity to offline behavioral patterns. This paper responds to calls for conceptual departures by theorizing Twitter issue-response hashtags as instances of ‘momentary connectedness,’ topical structures of momentary connectivity that include original tweets, retweets, “quote tweets”, reply and mention clusters, sharing via direct messages, and acts of liking. Most of these forms of uptake in Twitter issue-response spaces involve imagined audiences, making it difficult to situate them in concrete conceptual categories, such as publics and communities. Further complicating the public-private distinction, tweets that are public can enter the private realm via the option of direct messaging. Momentary connectedness accepts the multifaceted nature of Twitter hashtag networks by seeing them as constructed through multiple forms of uptake and being situated in private and public domains, thus providing a more natively digital conceptualization that recognizes the permeability of online communication across boundaries. These concepts are illustrated with a case study.

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Battlefront Volunteers: Mapping And Deconstructing Platform-Enabled Civilian Resilience Networks In Ukraine [FULL]
Author: Olga Boichak

Abstract: The highly mediated nature of social reality causes unprecedented reliance on digital tools and platforms to handle impending crises. Human connections, forged in the process of computer-mediated interaction, lie at the core of the civilian resilience networks that operate in the wartime. The 2014 annexation of Crimea, along with the subsequent developments in eastern Ukraine, marked the beginning of the battlefront volunteer movement – an array of civilian initiatives, aimed at supporting the Ukrainian military. Using Facebook to construct elaborate social infrastructures, battlefront volunteers leveraged social media to muster physical and technological resources and help the army soldiers protect the state from an impending military threat. Apart from a growing body of social movement literature, evidence on mediated ways of civilian participation in military conflicts remains inconclusive. This paper presents a theoretical enquiry into the sociomaterial practices of the battlefront volunteer groups. Drawing upon network analysis and a set of in-depth interviews with the users involved in these initiatives, I map and deconstruct the civilian resilience networks, illuminating the role and use of Facebook in the creation of social infrastructures by battlefront volunteers.

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Identifying Political Topics In Social Media Messages: A Lexicon-Based Approach [FULL]
Authors: Sam Jackson, Feifei Zhang, Olga Boichak, Lauren Bryant, Yingya Li, Jeff Hemsley, Jennifer Stromer-Galley, Bryan Semaan and Nancy McCracken

Abstract: In this paper, we introduce a lexicon-based method for identifying political topics in social media messages. After discussing several critical shortcomings of unsupervised topic identification, we describe the lexicon-based approach. We test our lexicon on candidate-generated campaign messages in Facebook and Twitter in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The results show that this approach provides reliable results for eight of nine political topic categories. We describe steps to improve our approach and how it can be used for future research on political topics in social media messages.

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Is Twitter A Generalizable Public Sphere? A Comparison Of 2016 Presidential Campaign Issue Importance Among General And Twitter Publics [WIP]
Author: Dorian Davis 

Abstract: News media often cite Twitter and other social media metrics as measures of public opinion. This study draws on a quota sample (N=420) of U.S. adult Twitter users to determine the representativeness of the Twitter public in relation to the U.S. general population around 14 issues related to the 2016 presidential campaign, and considers implications for news media coverage of the Twitterverse and other social media populations as representations of the greater public sphere.


Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Spiral Of Silence 2.0: Political Self-Censorship Among Young Facebook Users [FULL]
Authors: Christian Pieter Hoffmann and Christoph Lutz

Abstract: Do social media strengthen or weaken citizens’ political participation? Authors have found that, while lowering the cost of political engagement, social media may also foster the fragmentation of audiences and contribute to an increasingly polarized political discourse. This study applies the “spiral of silence” theory to political discourse among digital natives on the social networking platform Facebook. We hypothesize that users perceiving their online network as politically heterogeneous will be more likely to engage in self-censorship and limit their political self-expression. Previous studies have found that impression management, i.e., communication behavior geared towards projecting a socially desirable self, increases engagement in online social networks. Accordingly, we hypothesize that users geared towards impression management will be more engaged in online political discourse. We test these hypotheses based on a survey among German Facebook users under the age of 30 and using structural equation modeling. We find that network heterogeneity does indeed increase political self-censorship while impression management increases users’ willingness to speak out.

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Growth And Inequality Of Participation In Online Communities: A Longitudinal Analysis [WIP]
Authors: Elliot Panek, Connor Hollenbach, Jinjie Yang and Tyler Rhodes

Abstract: The online communities of Reddit provide an ideal testing ground for determining the ways in which growth affect communities. By analyzing comments made on Reddit between 2008 and 2016, we demonstrate that Reddit consists of multiple communities growing at different rates. In several cases, community size is associated with greater inequality of participation in discourse, supporting the notion that members of online communities become less interactive and more passive as communities grow. However, one community, r/TwoXChromosomes, exhibits increasing equality of participation in discourse as it grows.

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

11:01

Me, Myselfie, And I: Individual And Platform Differences In Selfie Taking And Sharing Behavior [FULL]
Authors: Zhiying Yue, Zena Toh and Michael Stefanone

Abstract: Although there is growing research on selfie-related behavior via social media, many questions remain about the relationship between traditional mass media and nature of selfies, their function in relationship maintenance, and a range of individual characteristics that may better explain taking and sharing digital images of one’s self. In this study, we explicate specific dimensions of the selfie, and evaluate a range of individual differences to explain taking and sharing behavior. Results show that the appearance-based contingency of self-worth explains individual focus on image and selfies. In addition, Snapchat is a significantly more popular platform for sharing selfies, opposed to Facebook. Surprisingly, male participants take and share more selfies, compared to females. Results are discussed in terms of online self-disclosure, and suggestions for future research are offered.

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

11:01

Motivations For Sharing News On Social Media [WIP]
Authors: L. Y. C. Wong and Jacquelyn Burkell

Abstract: Social media have become an important part of everyday communication and a mechanism for sharing and ‘re-sharing’ of information. We discover news through our social network and pass along what we deem relevant to others. Numerous studies focus on the sharing of personal information (both online and offline) but less research examines news sharing practices — especially via social media. Understanding why we choose to share news and non-personal content online is vital in a world where, more and more, we turn to social media and our online social networks for news and information about the world around us. This research explores factors that influence our decision to share and re-share non-personal content with others in an online environment, specifically the choices we make when we share news.

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

11:01

Public Friends And Private Sharing: Understanding Shifting Privacies In Sharing Culture [FULL]
Authors: Zoetanya Sujon and Lisette Johnston

Abstract: This paper seeks to address the tension between privacy and sharing culture. Despite many claims that privacy is dead, research suggests that there is a shift from privacy as an individualized right based around control to something more social, more embedded, more public and more networked. Drawing from 7 media diaries, interviews with those diarists and a survey (N=270) of London, UK residents aged 18-36, we aim for a better picture of privacy and sharing culture as lived experiences. Based on this evidence, we identify a number of themes. First, although respondents identify sharing as embedded and networked, their experiences and understanding of privacy remains more traditional. For most, privacy is an individualized right focused on control. In addition, we find several themes emerging from the data – privacy matters, particularly social privacy; respondents commonly use a kind of public persona on social media profiles; and respondents exercise sharing strategies in part to protect their privacy, but also for managing the sharing expectations of their social media use.

Saturday July 29, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

12:30

Lunch (self-organized)

Saturday July 29, 2017 12:30 - 14:00
Self-organized Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

14:00

Fireside Chat 2A: How Twitter Canada Uses Data to Tell the Story of Elections
Abstract: Politics is a huge part of the conversation on Twitter and for the team at Twitter Canada, it's also a key component of Twitter engagement strategy with the media. Join the organization's Head of Communications Cam Gordon for an inside look at how the Twitter uses data, insights and research as an engine for telling political stories in Canada. Focus will be on governments at the municipal, provincial and federal level with an added look at how the data and conversations change (both in the media and on Twitter) at each level. 

Invited Speaker:  
Cam Gordon is the Head of Communications for Twitter Canada. Cam works with journalists across Canada, keeping them informed of the latest happenings with Twitter and sharing Canadian Twitter stories rooted in politics, sports, entertainment and other areas. Prior to Twitter, Cam spent 10+ years working for two of Canada’s most well-respected communications firms, Hill+Knowlton Strategies and High Road Communications. At these agencies, Cam worked with clients such as LG Electronics, Disney, 3M, TELUS, Spin Master and American Express

Politics is a huge part of the conversation on Twitter and for the team at Twitter Canada, it's also a key component of Twitter engagement strategy with the media. Join the organization's Head of Communications Cam Gordon for an inside look at how the Twitter uses data, insights and research as an engine for telling political stories in Canada. Focus will be on governments at the municipal, provincial and federal level with an added look at how the data and conversations change (both in the media and on Twitter) at each level. 


Moderators
avatar for Jenna Jacobson

Jenna Jacobson

Assistant Professor, Ryerson University
@jacobsonjenna

Saturday July 29, 2017 14:00 - 15:00
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

14:00

Panel 2B: Instagram And The Rare Books Community: An Insiders’ View
Panel Speakers: Alvan Bregman, David Fernandez, Jillian Sparks and Robin Desmeules


Abstract: This panel will be based on the experiences of three successful programs addressing the rare book community on Instagram: it will focus on both theoretical and practical aspects of this project. Within their individual presentations, panelists will describe the development of their Instagram programs in terms of goals and objectives, assessment and outcomes. They will consider the place of Instagram within a larger social media/communication strategy and the extent to which it is integrated with other social media platforms. The question of audience will be addressed: do programs mostly tap into an existing community or do they create a new community? Experiences with keeping and making use of statistics and other records, time spent and overhead costs, and posting norms and etiquette will also be shared. Areas for future research will be examined. 

David Fernández’ talk is entitled “On the use of instant commonplace books”. In it, he outlines the significance of photo-sharing applications in the context of rare books and special collections libraries and explores how social media platforms like Instagram have brought together communities of readers, bibliophiles, book historians, and librarians in the last six years. He examines the multiple methods used to present images of books, manuscripts, archives and other heritage materials to diverse audiences, while also formulating ideas about curating compelling and relevant content. Two arguments are presented: first, that Instagram is an effective interface to participate in substantial conversations on the nature of rare books and special collections; second, that this application can also be viewed as a commonplace or scrapbook as it enables users to compile not only images but also knowledge into rather organized systems. Ultimately, it is suggested that Instagram has a central role in the development of online identities for rare books and special collections libraries in response to their mission as centres of knowledge and research. 

Prior to starting their Instagram account in January 2016, the W.D. Jordan Rare Books and Special Collections at Queen's University was a relatively unknown library. Jillian Sparks will present on how Instagram has put W.D. Jordan Rare Books and Special Collections on the map and generated international connections within the rare book community. Her talk will highlight community-driven hashtag challenges, engagement by Queen's University users versus outside users, and finding a unique voice within the #librariesofinstagram community. 

Launched in February 2016, @mcgill_rare is the labour of love of a dynamic quartet of McGill librarians from four different branches and units in the Library. Robin Desmeules will provide an overview of their work to build a following, to develop general guidelines and procedures, and to balance all of this work as a team, harmonizing individual perspectives into a collective voice for McGill’s Instagram feed. This talk will reflect on lessons learned, navigating current issues and events, and the role the wider rare books Instagram community played in helping to shape this voice through shared hashtags and challenges. 

------
Bios

Alvan Bregman
(panel chair) is Head, W.D. Jordan Rare Books and Special Collections, Queen’s University Library, Kingston, Ontario. He received his Ph.D. and MLS from the University of Toronto. He is also Associate Professor Emeritus, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where for many years he was the Rare Book Collections Librarian. He is the author of Emblemata: The emblem books of Andrea Alciato (Newton, PA: 2007) and of numerous articles on rare books and special collections. 

Robin Desmeules has been a Rare Books Cataloguing Librarian at McGill University since April 2015, and is one of four librarians responsible for managing the Instagram account @mcgill_rare, alongside Jennifer Garland, Sarah Severson, and Anna Dysert. Robin obtained her MLIS from McGill University in 2014, and holds a MA in Music and Culture from Carleton University and a BA in Music and Political Science from Laurentian University. Her current research interests involve critical approaches to knowledge organization and epistemology, intersectional librarianship, and tinkering with linked data. 

David Fernández is a Rare Book Librarian at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto. His work, research, and teaching interests focus on the history of the book, Latin American Studies, and Colonialism. David is mainly responsible for the @fisherlibrary Instagram account. 

Jillian Sparks is the Special Collections Librarian at W.D. Jordan Rare Books and Special Collections, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario. She holds a MLIS and Certificate in Books Studies from the University of Iowa and a MA in English from the University of Victoria. Her current research interests include special collections instruction and primary source literacy, history of the book and bookbinding, and the scientific works of John Wilkins. Jillian is also the curator of the Robertson Davies Collection and coordinates the social media accounts for @jordan_library. 



Saturday July 29, 2017 14:00 - 15:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

14:00

Panel 2C: Women In Social Media – Safe And Unsafe Spaces
MODERATORS:

Caroline Haythornthwaite is Professor, School of Information Studies, Syracuse University, with former academic positions at The University of British Columbia, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and an earlier career as a programmer and systems analyst. Her research focuses on how the Internet and information and communication technologies support work, learning and social interaction, including research on social media, e-learning and learning analytics, and online crowds and communities. 

https://haythorn.wordpress.com/

Stephanie Teasley is Research Professor and Director of the Learning, Education & Design Lab (LED), School of Information, University of Michigan. Her research has focuses on issues of collaboration and learning, looking specifically at how sociotechnical systems can be used to support effective collaborative processes and successful learning outcomes. As Director of the LED lab, she leads learning analytics-based research to investigate how instructional technologies and digital media are used to innovate teaching, learning, and collaboration.

Panel Speakers: 

Jennifer Stromer-Galley is Professor at the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University, and an affiliated faculty member with the Department of Communication and Rhetorical Studies, and with the Department of Political Science. She is currently President of the Association of Internet Researchers. She has been studying “social media” since before it was called that, addressing online interaction and influence in a variety of contexts, including political forums and online games. 

Ingrid Erickson is Assistant Professor at the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University. She received her PhD from the Center for Work, Technology, and Organization in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University. Her research centers on the way that mobile devices and ubiquitous digital infrastructures are influencing how we work and communicate with one another, navigate and inhabit spaces, and engage in new types of sociotechnical practices.

Libby Hemphill is Associate Professor of Communication and Information Studies and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Humanities, Illinois Institute of Technology. http://www.casmlab.org

Alyssa Friend Wise is Associate Professor of Educational Communication and Technology, in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University.


Abstract: 

Addressing the conference theme of “Social Media for Social Good or Evil”, this panel highlights work on and by women in the area of social media. Panel members address research about the experience of women online, but also – because women study more than themselves – research by women about the pros and cons of engagement online via social media. Themes address online engagement in political, gaming, and learning environments. Panel presentations address ‘social media for social good’ in the positive impact of efforts that relate to coming to know and jointly understand ‘the other’ across cultural and political differences. ‘Social media for evil’ is found in the negative treatment of women and marginalized communities online as demonstrated in online gaming and political environments. Acknowledging  the presence of both good and evil, the tensions this creates, and the hard work needed to form and reform social media spaces in the face of this duality, we hope to elicit a discussion in the service of better communication, dialogue and democratic process. As a whole, we see that the more social media dominates online interaction, the more important it is to address representation online. It is thus a ripe occasion to explore the role and extent that social media plays in creating both safe and unsafe spaces for interaction, learning, discussion, membership, and leadership in society.

The panel will be led and moderated by Caroline Haythornthwaite and Stephanie Teasley. We will present an introductory framing of the panel and the topic of Women in Social Media: Safe and Unsafe Spaces followed by short presentations by panel members Ingrid Erickson, Libby Hempfill, and Alyssa Wise. Stephanie Teasley will moderate a Q&A period consisting first of questions to panel members to address women’s experiences with social media as well as in academia or other work environments, and then opening up the Q&A session to the audience for further discussion.


Saturday July 29, 2017 14:00 - 15:00
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

14:00

Panel 2D: Critical Approaches To Social Media Discourses
Panel Speakers: Eleonora Esposito, Majid Khosravinik, Francesco Sinatora and Mohammedwesam Amer


Abstract: Digitally mediated communication has created its native genres and forms of interaction, which combine various channels and modalities of communication as well as integrating synchronous and asynchronous modes of communication. This new communication protocol of Social Media Communication has been breaking away from the traditional clear‐cut demarcation between text producers and consumers, replacing the unidirectional, one‐to‐many interface of mass media with what appears to be a many‐to‐many dynamic of discursive practice. For its fluid, changeable and non‐static nature, these discursive practices pose a challenge in terms of genre definitions, which, in turn, impacts on issues of adopting/adapting linguistic methods and approaches in the analysis of such discourses.

This Panel aims at accommodating the new technological and epistemological challenges as well as arguing for viability of a continued critical approach for these new spaces of participatory communication following on traditions of Critical Discourse Analysis. By dealing with discourse, not technology as its central object of analysis, the contributions of this panel do not simply investigate what happens on the digital platforms in isolation but engage with how it may shape and influence social and political sphere of our life worlds. Without overemphasizing the distinctions between online and offline worlds, the contributions of this panel set out to problematise the intertextual and interdiscursive relations between the two levels of Social Media discursive practice and repertoire of dominant discourses in the wider society. Such an endeavour aims to do a socially committed, problem‐oriented, textually based, critical analysis of Social Media discourse as an articulation of CDS of the participatory web.  

With three papers on the topic, the panel will not only tackle the main theoretical, methodological and applicational issues related to the analysis of Social Media data, but will also present case studies on the use of Social Media in non-Western settings, the Middle East and the Caribbean, with a focus on issues of identity, power and representation.

Saturday July 29, 2017 14:00 - 15:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:00

Coffee Break
Saturday July 29, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
TRS 1-148 & 1-150 TRSM Commons - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

15:30

Session 3A: Health & Well-Being
Moderators
avatar for Lisa Given

Lisa Given

Associate Dean, Research and Development, Swinburne University of Technology

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

15:30

Session 3B: Language, Music & Culture
Moderators
avatar for Elliot Panek

Elliot Panek

Assistant Professor, The University of Alabama
I am currently researching the social dynamics of online communities (Reddit, in particular). I also research the relationship between social media use and a variety of psychological factors (e.g., narcissism and self-control), as well as media selection behavior. I'd love to talk... Read More →

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:30

Session 3C: Politics II
Moderators
avatar for Jill Hopke

Jill Hopke

Assistant Professor, DePaul University
I am an Assistant Professor of Journalism in the College of Communication at DePaul University in Chicago. My work explores the interface of people, the environment, new technologies and social movements.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:30

Session 3D: Young People & Social Media Data
Moderators
avatar for Anabel Quan-Haase

Anabel Quan-Haase

Professor, Western University
Looking forward to hearing about novel methods in the study of social media, new trends, and social activism. I am also curious about interdisciplinary teams and how they work. Any success stories, best practices or failures?

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

Benefits And Drawbacks Of Using Social Media To Grieve Following The Loss Of Pet [FULL]
Authors: Jessica Vitak, Pamela Wisniewski, Zahra Ashktorab and Karla Badillo-Urquiola

Abstract: As social media becomes more deeply embedded into our daily lives, researchers are examining how previously private disclosures and interactions are manifesting in semi-public spaces. This study evaluates how sites like Facebook may help users grieve following the loss of a family pet. Through an empirical study of Facebook users, we evaluate survey responses (N=396) and users’ actual Facebook posts related to pet loss (N=190) to better understand how individuals use (or do not use) social media as part of the grieving process. We find that users weigh several benefits and drawbacks before making these sensitive disclosures on Facebook, including whether they think posting will mitigate or perpetuate their emotional pain, the privacy of the experience vs. the public nature of sharing, and whether their disclosures will be met with support or dismissal (i.e., disenfranchised grief). We conclude by discussing implications for theory around grief and social support as well as the design of social media interfaces that support grieving processes for the loss of a loved one.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

15:31

Examining Sentiments And Popularity Of Pro- And Anti-Vaccination Videos On Youtube [FULL]
Authors: Melodie Yun-Ju Song and Anatoliy Gruzd

Abstract: Vaccine misinformation on social media poses significant drawbacks to the efforts of vaccine coverage rates. This research studies the interlinkages between pro- and anti-vaccine YouTube Videos to help public health professionals explore new ways to reach anti-vaccine and vaccine-hesitant audiences. Using YouTube’s API, we retrieved 9,489 recommended videos from 250 seeds using keywords such as “vaccines” and its derivatives. We then manually identified 1,936 videos directly related to vaccination and then categorized their vaccine sentiment into pro-, anti-, and neutral. Results show that 66.6% of the videos were anti-vaccine, and only 21.3% are pro-vaccine, 13.1% are neutral. Anti-vaccine videos were significantly more prevalent in the “News & Politics” and “People & Blogs” video category; while pro-vaccine videos were more prevalent in the “Education” and “Science & Technology” categories. Results also show that anti-vaccine sentiment videos have higher values of closeness centrality (p

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

15:31

Promoting Hook-Ups Or Filling Sexual Health Information Gaps? Exploring Young People’s Sex Talk On Facebook [WIP]
Authors: Tien Ee Dominic Yeo and Tsz Hang Chu

Abstract: Social media hold enormous potential for sexuality education and sexual health promotion among young people given the audience reach and interactive functions that could be adapted for intervention delivery. This paper reports the preliminary findings of an ongoing research project on the use of social media as a platform for peer sexual communication. To explore the nature of content posted on Facebook confession pages, which host semi-anonymous peer exchanges, 2186 original posts in a Facebook “sex secrets” page popular with college students in Hong Kong were analyzed. Conventional sexual activities within the context of romantic heterosexual relationships were most frequently mentioned in the posts. Problematic or risky sexual activities such as hook-ups (spontaneous casual sex) and sexting that are common among American college students were not salient. Nevertheless, the sexual culture of Hong Kong college students was not without peculiarities. Fetish or roleplay, for instance, was mentioned thrice as often as sexting. Findings on intimate concerns illuminate the needs and gaps in sexuality education and sexual health knowledge.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

15:31

The Cognitive Benefits Of Social Media Use In Later Life: Results Of A Randomized, Controlled Pilot Study [WIP]
Author: Kelly Quinn

Abstract: Research on the effects of social media use at older ages has largely been focused on social benefits. Yet, participation in these new media forms may result in other favorable outcomes, such as improved cognitive functioning. Using a wait list control design, this study examines the effects of social media engagement among adult social media non-users, aged 65 and older, in four cognitive domains: attention, processing speed, working memory, and inhibitory control. Baseline and multiple post-tests indicate improvement of intervention participants in processing speed and inhibitory control. These findings demonstrate that the benefits of social media use at older ages extend beyond mere social engagement, and into other domains of everyday well being.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

15:31

Challenging Music Education: The Transformative Potential Of Social Media [WIP]
Authors: Stephanie Horsley and Janice Waldron

Abstract: Music is a ubiquitous phenomenon that is used to shape personal, community, and cultural identities and forms the basis of significant economic activity and engagement. Given that musical activities are predicated on social interaction, the potential of social media to intensify and extend musical action has significant implications for developing a critical approach to music education for twenty-first century citizens. This paper explores the intersection of social media, educational theory, and music education to argue for the importance of transforming elements of music education to reflect the ways in which individuals currently navigate the various uses (and abuses) of music in a digitally networked society, where music is a powerful social and cultural tool. A current exploratory study of post-secondary music education classes is discussed, and the implications for a “future” music education are presented.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:31

Glyphexts (Glyphs + Text = Effect) As Information Divide: Screen Reader Impact On Interpreting Sentimentality In Online Social Media Review Posts [WIP]
Author: Laurie Bonnici

Abstract: Subjective information in the form of online social media (OSM) opinion posts increasingly functions as useful information in times of uncertainty. Sentimentality frequently expressed in OSM posts includes emotions such as excitement, disbelief, and rhetoric. Sentimentality is conveyed through glyphs expressed in isolation (?) or (!), success repetition (????), (!!!!!), or (?!), and non-standard punctuation such as the interrobang (‽).Application of a nascent lens, Cognitive Authority Framework – Quality Information Source (CAF-QIS) has revealed that the application of glyphs is commonly and frequently applied in OSM. Yet accessibility software employed by those with visual challenges allows for filtering of extra-character content in documents, including web content such as OSM. Some screen readers exclude conveyance of glyphs entirely. Through open-ended survey responses and first-hand interview accounts with visually challenged users active on OSM opinion sites, this project seeks to uncover deeper understanding of how they determine trustworthiness of opinions and better opportunities to access emotionally informed subjective content. The concept of glyphicality provides a lens to interpret sentimentality within the specialized social media domain.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:31

Information Flow On Digital Social Networks During A Cultural Event: Methodology And Analysis Of The “European Night Of Museums 2016” On Twitter [FULL]
Authors: Brigitte Juanals and Jean-Luc Minel

Abstract: In this paper, we present first, a representation of flows of messages and their contents on Twitter, then an instrumented methodology to describe and analyze these flows and their distributions in relation with the stakeholders which reflects engagement and interactions between different types of stakeholders. We apply our methodology and associated tools on the 12th edition of the cultural event "European Night of Museums" (#NDM16).

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:31

Translation, Social Media, And The Concept Of Augmentation: The Good, The Bad, And The Interdisciplinary [WIP]
Author: Renée Desjardins

Abstract: This paper begins with an assessment of how the digital landscape has impacted the Canadian language services industry, with specific attention given to the relationship between social media and translation. While social media has generally created new opportunities for language experts (the “good”), it is our hypothesis that there remains a significant lack of consilience between the two industry sectors (the “bad”). We believe that by underscoring the common ground between Translation Studies and Social Media Studies (the “interdisciplinary”), we may find ways of ‘augmenting’ (cf. Davenport and Kirby, 2015) the status and role of professional human translators. We explore three specific areas in this research: the value-added of professional translators in the context of social media monitoring; self-translation phenomena on social platforms such as Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter; and, finally, the necessity of human intervention in the translation of ‘new’ social languages such as Emoji. This research speaks to anyone interested in intercultural communication in online setting (specifically on social media). It can also be of interest to social platforms looking to embed translation applications within their platforms to optimize the user’s experience. We leverage the methodological framework of Descriptive Translation Studies applied to social media monitoring and incorporate real-world examples to support our hypotheses.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:31

Facebook Escapism And Online Political Participation [WIP]
Author: Christian Pieter Hoffmann, Christoph Lutz, Severina Müller and Miriam Meckel

Abstract: Recently, much scholarship has investigated how social media affect citizens’ political participation, online and offline. In general, social media use has a positive but weak effect on participation. However, different use types exert a differentiated influence. While information-rich and active uses result in more participation, entertainment-oriented and passive uses lead to less participation. In this contribution, we introduce the concept of escapist Facebook use. We argue that Facebook might activate users to participate politically through what we call accidental political engagement, even if used in escapist ways. Based on a survey of 762 Facebook users in Germany and using linear regression, we test the influence of three Facebook use types on online political participation: consumptive, participatory and productive. Consumptive use has a negative and productive use a positive effect on online political participation. Escapism has a small positive effect. It moderates consumptive use negatively and productive use positively, strengthening existing tendencies.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:31

Is No Election News Good News? The 2015 Canadian Election And Locally Relevant News On Twitter [WIP]
Authors: Jaigris Hodson and April Lindgren 

Abstract: This study uses the 2015 Canadian Federal election as a case study to examine whether Twitter is used to spread locally relevant political news in smaller communities in the month leading up to a collection. We examined eight smaller communities across Canada, each with differing levels of traditional local media access (television, radio, and print). We wanted to discover, particularly in communities underserved by terrestrial local media, whether Twitter would help to fill an information gap during election time by helping to spread locally relevant political information. Preliminary analysis has revealed that most information shared on Twitter accounts in our eight communities was national rather than local in scope. Influencers, as identified by the number of -@ mentions, tended to be national, rather than local, and general activity on Twitter did not reflect overall population of an area, or any specific locally important issue. Thus we conclude that despite its potential, Twitter is currently not a useful counterbalance for a declining local traditional.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:31

Social Media, U.S. Presidential Campaigns, and Public Opinion Polls: Disentangling Effects [WIP]
Authors: Patricia Rossini, Jeff Hemsley, Sikana Tanupabrungsun, Feifei Zhang, Jerry Robinson and Jennifer Stromer-Galley

Abstract: The use of digital technologies by political campaigns have been a topic of scholarly concern for over two decades. However, these studies have been mostly focused on analyzing the use of digital platforms without considering contextual factors of the race, like public opinion polling data. However, polling data is an important information source for both citizens and candidates, and provide the latter with information that might drive strategic communication. In this paper, we explore the relationship between the use of social media in the 2016 U.S. Presidential Elections and candidates' standing in public opinion polls focusing on the surfacing and primary stages of the campaign. We are also interested in understanding whether candidates use Twitter and Facebook in similar ways. We use automated content analysis to categorize social media posts from all 21 Republican and Democratic candidates that ran for president in 2016. Specifically, we are interested in observing whether a candidate's performance in the polls drives certain communicative strategies, such as the use of attacks and messages of advocacy, as well as the focus on personal image or policy issues.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:31

Strategic Temporality On Social Media During The General Election Of The 2016 U.S. Presidential Campaign [FULL]
Authors: Feifei Zhang, Sikana Tanupabrungsun, Jeff Hemsley, Jerry Robinson, Bryan Semaan, Lauren Bryant, Jennifer Stromer-Galley, Olga Boichak and Yatish Hegde

Abstract: To date, little attention has been paid to the temporal nature of campaigns as they respond to events or react to the different stages of a political election--what we define as strategic temporality. This article seeks to remedy this lack of research by examining campaign Facebook and Twitter messaging shifts during the 2016 U.S. Presidential general election. We used supervised machine-learning techniques to predict the types of messages that campaigns employ via social media and analyzed time-series data to identify messaging shifts over the course of the general election. We also examined how social media platforms and candidate party affiliation shape campaign messaging. Results suggest differences exist in the types of campaign messages produced on different platforms during the general election. As election day drew closer, campaigns generated more calls-to-action and informative messages on both Facebook and Twitter. This trend existed in advocacy campaign messages as well, but only on Twitter. Both advocacy and attack tweets were posted more frequently around Presidential and Vice-Presidential debate dates.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:31

Clickwrap Impact: Quick-Join Options And Ignoring Privacy And Terms Of Service Policies Of Social Networking Services [WIP]
Authors: Jonathan Obar and Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch

Abstract: A qualitative survey analysis was conducted, assessing user interactions with the consent materials of a fictitious social networking service, NameDrop. Findings reveal that the clickwrap quick-join option, common to social networking services, hinders consent processes by making privacy and terms of service policies difficult to find, and by discouraging engagement with privacy and reputation protections by suggesting that consent materials are unimportant. Implications for the future of notice policy are discussed.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

Context Collapse And Student Social Media Networks: Where Life And High School Collide [WIP]
Authors: Vanessa Dennen, Stacey Rutledge, Lauren Bagdy, Jerrica Rowlett, Shannon Burnick and Sarah Joyce

Abstract: This study examines the intersection of high school students’ in-school and out-of-school communities in a social media context. Students in two classes (10th and 12th grade) participated in a 3-day unit about social media networks and context collapse. During this unit, they diagrammed their communities and social media tool networks and discussed related issues governing how they use social media in and out of school. Findings show that high school students experience context collapse, but do not view it as a negative occurrence so much as an expected one in networked digital environments. They are adept at managing context collapse, and use a variety of means to communicate online with different groups of people. Specifically, they maintain technological lines of separation between their family and other groups, and they relegate digital interactions with their closest friends to more private spaces than the ones that social networking tools afford.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

What Is Your Data Silhouette? Raising Teen Awareness Of Their Data Traces In Social Media [WIP]
Authors: Amelia Acker and Leanne Bowler

Abstract: The paper reports on a series of data literacy workshops for young people ages 11 to 17, held in three Pittsburgh-area public libraries during Fall 2016. The workshops, called Data Silhouettes, served two purposes. First, as a mechanism for examining young peoples’ understandings of their data worlds and secondly, to pilot test a library-based learning experience designed to reveal the relationship between social media behaviour and the data traces left behind.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

‘My Data, My Bad …’ - Young People’s Personal Data Understandings And (Counter)Practices [WIP]
Authors: Luci Pangrazio and Neil Selwyn

Abstract: Large quantities of personal data are now being generated, collated and processed through young people’s uses of social media. Third parties increasingly use these data to profile, predict and position the individuals they are associated with. These developments have prompted calls for individuals to adopt more informed and critical stances toward how and why their data is being used – i.e. to become vigilant ‘data citizens’. Against this background, this paper reports on an ongoing project that explores the extent to which social media users are aware of their personal data and its attendant issues/uses. Drawing on participatory design research with four diverse groups of young people (aged 14 to 18 years), this paper investigates the possibilities of making third party (re)uses of personal data openly available in digitized form for young people to access, interpret and use to develop counter-practices and resistant tactics. The results of these interventions – while only partially successful – provide valuable insights into the technical, informatic, organizational and social issues surrounding how young people engage with social media, and how academic concerns over data relate to everyday lived experiences of social media use in a digital age.

Saturday July 29, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

17:00

Poster Reception
  1. '“How Do I Tell My Advisor?”: Socio-Emotional Motivations for Information Sharing in Academia Stack Exchange' by Adam Worrall, Rachel Osolen and Alicia Cappello
  2. 'Information Bias and Social Media: How Algorithmic Regulation Can Strengthen the Republic' by Alexander Rochefort
  3. 'Beyond “Lurkers” and “Nonlurkers”: Investigating Social Network Site Usage Habits, Personality, and Self-esteem' by Angela M Cirucci
  4. 'Twitter Reaction to UVA/Rolling Stone Rape Scandal' by Brittany Jefferson
  5. 'Crisis on Twitter: Information, Emotion and Political Content' by Caroline Haythornthwaite, Yingya Li, Swati Nibban and Jennifer Sonne
  6. 'Participation Divides Amongst Airbnb Users' by Christoph Lutz and Gemma Newlands
  7. 'Cyber Offender Profiling: Cyber Stalking' by Daiji Hario and Kenji Yoshimi
  8. 'Who is forked on GitHub? Collaboration among Open Source developers' by Dorota Celińska
  9. 'Active User or Lurker? A Phenomenological Investigation of Graduate Students in Social Media Spaces' by Enilda Romero-Hall
  10. 'Restoring the patient's power through electronic word-of-mouth' by Esther Brainin and Keren Landsman
  11. '#digitalnomad v. #remotework: Exploring Trends in Mobile Work on Twitter' by Ingrid Erickson, Jeff Hemsley, Mohammad Jarrahi and Amir Karami
  12. 'The Use of Social Media for Research Promotion and Dissemination' by Jacky Au Duong, Frauke Zeller, Alexa Pavliuc, Lauren Dwyer and Kaela Malozewski
  13. 'Showing Myself: Sharing Photographs on Social Media' by Jacquie Burkell, Chandell Gosse, Alexandre Fortier and Sarah Heath
  14. 'A STUDY OF DIFFUSION IN THE DRIBBBLE ART WORLD' by Jeff Hemsley, Suchitra Deekshitula, Sikana Tanupabrungsun, Jennifer Sonne and Yihan Yu
  15. 'Social media and inclusion: attitudes towards disability and mega-sport events - the London 2012 Paralympic Games & Toronto 2015 Parapan American Games' by Jill Le Clair
  16. '#orthorexia on Instagram: Exploring the online conversation and community using the Netlytic software' by Jillian Lacasse, Jordan Larocque, Sara Santarossa and Sarah Woodruff
  17. 'Difference in Twitter Usage tendency of Candidates During Election Campaign Due to Differences in Electoral System of Japan' by Kenji Yoshimi and Daiji Hario
  18. 'Not Quite Every Block: Neighborhood Disparities of Hyperlocal Social Network Use in Chicago' by Libby Hemphill and Ingrid Erickson
  19. 'Health communication and prevention in Hispanic communities: An exploratory analysis of Twitter usage' by Lina Gomez, Ramon Borges-Tavarez and Alexandra Prieto-Rico
  20. 'Twitter Users’ Privacy Concerns: What do Their Accounts’ First Names Tell Us?' by Lu Xiao and Daniela Fernandez Espinosa
  21. 'Politics of engagement' by Nadine Nakagawa
  22. 'Designing for Diversity: Intercultural Information Interactions and Engagement Through YouTube' by Nahyeon Kim, Nadia Caidi and Niel Chah
  23. 'Automated Diffusion? Bots and Their Influence During the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election' by Olga Boichak, Sikana Tanupabrungsun, Daniela Fernandez Espinosa and Jeff Hemsley
  24. 'Filtering the truth on Instagram: Exploring #nofilter images when a filter has in fact been used, a mixed methods approach using Netlytic and photo analysis' by Paige Coyne, Sara Santarossa and Sarah J. Woodruff
  25. 'Social Media Use in Strengthening Networks of Stakeholders of the Local Food Innovation System in Ontario' by Pawandeep Kaushik, Ataharul Chowdhury and Helen Hambly Odame
  26. 'Attitudes Regarding Physicians’ Accessibility Via Social Media' by Raywat Deonandan
  27. '#fitspo on Instagram: A mixed-methods approach using Netlytic and photo analysis, uncovering the online discussion and author/image characteristics' by Sara Santarossa, Paige Coyne, Carly Lisinski and Sarah Woodruff
  28. 'Where do they look?: An eye-tracking investigation of activism- and slacktivism-promoting Facebook posts.' by Sarah Jayne Connick-Keefer and Annie Roy-Charland
  29. 'Does Compassion Go Viral? Social Media, Caring, and the Fort McMurray Wildfire' by Shelley Boulianne, Joanne Minaker and Tim Haney
  30. 'Peek-A-Boo! Understanding Factors Associated with Singaporean Adolescents’ Intention to Adopt Privacy Protection Behavior Using an Extended Theory of Planned Behavior' by Shirley S. Ho, May O. Lwin and Edmund W.J. Lee
  31. 'Microcelebrity Practices: Towards Cross-Platform Studies Through a Richness Framework' by Sikana Tanupabrungsun and Jeff Hemsley
  32. 'The Impact of Social Media to Indonesia Muslim Fashion Trend' by Siti Dewi Aisyah
  33. 'Making connections and sharing knowledge on the social determinants of health through social media: a survey of public health professionals' by Sume Ndumbe-Eyoh and Dor David Abelman
  34. 'A Clown, a Political Messiah or a Punching Bag? Crafting and Negotiating Multiple Celebrity Identities through Social Media' by Tommy Tse and Joey Chan
  35. 'Social Media Usage and International Students’ Cross-cultural Adaptation' by Weiming Huang and Takashi Nakamura

Saturday July 29, 2017 17:00 - 19:30
TRS 1-148 & 1-150 TRSM Commons - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

19:30

Dinner (self-organized)
Saturday July 29, 2017 19:30 - 21:00
Self-organized Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3
 
Sunday, July 30
 

08:30

Registration & Coffee Reception
Sunday July 30, 2017 08:30 - 09:00
TRS 1-148 & 1-150 TRSM Commons - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

09:00

Award Ceremony & Keynote: Ron Deibert- War in the World Brain
In 1937, H.G. Wells wrote an essay entitled the “World Brain,” in which he forecast a permanent encyclopedia accessible to all citizens of the earth simultaneously.  Should such a permanent encyclopedia every come to fruition, Wells predicted, it would dissolve all human conflict into unity.  Clearly, Wells’ assumptions were misguided.  While we have indeed created the basis for a world encyclopedia accessible by most everyone on Earth, the foundation for it is under assault.  Governments now routinely censor access to Internet resources using sophisticated censorship and deep-packet inspection systems. A vast architecture of planetary-wide surveillance has been constructed, borne out of the complementary interests of big business and Big Brother. Civil society organizations face an epidemic of targeted digital attacks from their adversaries. Heavily financed and well resourced state-backed "influence operations" poison the well of the public sphere with propaganda. Drawing from the research of the Citizen Lab (https://citizenlab.org/), I outline why and how digital technologies are contributing to and reinforcing human conflict and division, and then suggest some strategies to mitigate these trends. 

Speakers
avatar for Ron Deibert

Ron Deibert

Director, Citizen Lab, University of Toronto
Ron Deibert, (OOnt, PhD, University of British Columbia) is Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto. The Citizen Lab is an interdisciplinary research and development laboratory working at the intersection... Read More →


Sunday July 30, 2017 09:00 - 10:30
TRS 2-166 -8th Floor Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

10:30

Coffee Break
Sunday July 30, 2017 10:30 - 11:00
TRS 1-148 & 1-150 TRSM Commons - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

11:00

Session 4A: Opinion Mining
Moderators
avatar for Christoph Lutz

Christoph Lutz

Postdoc / Assistant Professor, BI Norwegian Business School
I am a researcher at BI Norwegian Business School Oslo and at the University of Leipzig. My work is in the field of new communication technologies and social media, where I investigate digital inequalities, online participation, trust, privacy and the sharing economy. I have a background... Read More →

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

11:00

Session 4B: Rumors & (In)Civility
Moderators
avatar for Katrin Tiidenberg

Katrin Tiidenberg

Associate Professor, Tallinn University

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:00

Session 4C: Business: Opportunities & Practices
Moderators
avatar for Donna Smith

Donna Smith

Professor, Ryerson University
Donna's research focus is on commitment-trust applied to B2B and B2C settings. She is studying social media campaigns initiated by retailers.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:00

Session 4D: Public Sector
Moderators
avatar for Jaigris Hodson

Jaigris Hodson

Assistant Professor, Royal Roads University
Jaigris Hodson (B.A. Royal Roads University, M.A., Ph.D. York/Ryerson) is an Assistant Professor in Office of Interdisciplinary Studies at Royal Roads University. Her doctoral research focused on compiling and understanding the self-professed corporate identities of Facebook... Read More →

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

11:01

#DistractinglySexy: How Social Media Was Used As A Counter Narrative On Gender In STEM [FULL]
Authors: Ann Pegoraro, Emily Tetzlaff, Emily Jago and Tammy Eger

Abstract: On June 8th, 2015, Nobel laureate Sir Tim Hunt freely expressed his opinion on mixed-gender labs, while attending a President's lunch at the World Conference of Science Journalists:
“Let me tell you about my trouble with girls. Three things happen when they are in the lab: You fall in love with them, they fall in love with you, and when you criticize them they cry.”
In the days following his statement, the hashtag #DistractinglySexy trended on Twitter. The purpose of this study was to investigate how Twitter users interpreted the Tim Hunt speech, and how they represented their message through visual media on Twitter. The software program Hashtracking was used to gather 58,969 tweets that contained an image from the #DistractinglySexy hashtag. Content analysis was used to analyze the images collected and a codebook was developed through an adaptation of the ‘Draw-a-Scientist Test’ (DAST), a test initially designed to reveal children’s attitudes and beliefs about science through the use of stereotypical features. To enable human coding of such a large data set, a purposeful sample of 3,648 images was extracted for analysis. Intercoder reliability scores ranged from 0.84 to 1.0, all within the acceptable range. The results of this study indicated that users of the hashtag predominately portrayed themselves posed in personal protective equipment, in a laboratory setting. This study contributes to social media literature, by illustrating how this medium was utilized to create counter narratives that combat and highlight the challenges women in STEM face.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

11:01

Labels And Sentiment In Social Media: On The Role Of Perceived Agency In Online Discussions Of The Refugee Crisis [FULL]
Authors: Ju-Sung Lee and Adina Nerghes

Abtract: Focusing on the recent events in the Middle East, that have pushed many to flee their countries and seek refuge in neighboring countries or in Europe, we investigate dynamics of label use in social media, the emergent patterns of labeling that can cause further disaffection and tension, and the sentiments associated with the different labels. For this, we examine key labels pertaining to the refugee/migrant crisis and their usage in the user comment thread of a highly viewed and informational video of the crisis on YouTube. The use of labels indicate that migration issues are being framed not only through labels characterizing the crisis but also by their describing individuals themselves. The sentiments associated with these labels depart from what one would normally expect; in particular, negative sentiment is attached to labels that would otherwise be deemed neutral or positive. Interestingly, both positive and negative labels exhibit increased negativity across time. Using topic modeling and sentiment analysis jointly, we discover that the latent topics of the most positive comments show more overlap than those topics of the most negative comments, which are more focused and partitioned. In terms of sentiment, we find that labels indicating some degree of perceived agency or opportunity, such as 'migrant' or 'immigrant', are embedded in less sympathetic comments than those labels indicating a need to escape war-torn regions or persecution (e.g., asylum seeker or refugee). Our study offers valuable insights into the direction of public sentiment and the nature of discussions surrounding this significant societal event as well as the nature of online opinion sharing.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

11:01

Stance Classification Of Twitter Debates: The Encryption Debate As A Use Case [FULL]
Authors: Aseel Addawood, Jodi Schneider and Masooda Bashir

Abstract: Social media have enabled a revolution in user-generated content. They allow users to connect, build community, produce and share content, and publish opinions. To better understand online users’ attitudes and opinions, we use stance classification. Stance classification is a relatively new and challenging approach to deepen opinion mining by classifying a user's stance in a debate. Our stance classification use case is tweets that were related to the spring 2016 debate over the FBI’s request that Apple decrypt a user’s iPhone. In this “encryption debate,” public opinion was polarized between advocates for individual privacy and advocates for national security. We propose a machine learning approach to classify stance in the debate, and a topic classification that uses lexical, syntactic, Twitter-specific, and argumentative features as a predictor for classifications. Models trained on these feature sets showed significant increases in accuracy relative to the baseline.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

11:01

A Study Of Tweet Veracity: Separating Rumors From Counter-Rumors [FULL]
Authors: Alton Chua and Snehasish Banerjee

Abstract: Rumors are known to propagate easily through computer-mediated communication channels such as Twitter. Their outbreak is often followed by the spread of counter-rumors, which are messages that debunk rumors. The likelihood of a tweet to be either a rumor or a counter-rumor is referred as tweet veracity in this paper. Since both rumors and counter-rumors are expected to contain claims, the two might not be easily distinguishable. If Internet users fail to separate rumors from counter-rumors, the latter will not serve its purpose. Hence, this paper investigates the extent to which tweet veracity could be predicted by content as well as contributors’ profile. The investigation focuses on the death hoax case of Singapore’s first prime minister Lee Kuan Yew on Twitter. A total of 1,000 tweets (500 rumors + 500 counter-rumors) are analyzed using binomial logistic regression. Results indicate that tweet veracity could be predicted by clarity, proper nouns, visual cues, references to credible sources as well as contributors’ duration of membership, and number of followers. The significance of these findings are highlighted.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Angels And Devils Of Digital Social Norm Enforcement: A Theory About Aggressive Versus Civilized Online Comments [FULL]
Authors: Lea Stahel and Katja Rost

Abstract: We develop a theory explaining when commenters choose to be aggressive versus civilized in social media depending on their personal social norm context. In particular, we enrich traditional social norm theory by the concept of moral legitimacy: it suggests that justifications, particularly those that put social norm violators outside of moral boundaries, are the supplier of aggression. Using the diversity of 45’982 comments of a real-world online firestorm our results confirm that social norm contexts matter strongly for online behaviour. The developed theory challenges existing speculations about online aggression and helps to develop strategies to encourage enlightened, civilized discourse in the Internet.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Comparing Civility And Inclusiveness Of E-Discussion Forum And Radio Talk Platform [WIP]
Authors: Shreenita Ghosh and Ritomaitree Sarkar

Abstract: This study examines the user comments of radio talk show call-ins and the shows’ corresponding digital discussion forums comments of NPR’s show ‘OnPoint’. While both media platforms are anonymous and moderated rigorously by NPR staff, the nature and content of the comments in both are vastly different. A frequency analysis followed by critical discourse analysis of the content suggests that the percentage civility of the content in both media, when measured through Papacharissi (2004) coding scheme, is very similar. However, the study shows difference in inclusivity, variety in content and degree of incivility. The study further hints that the role of moderator, the role of screener, and lastly the difference in the location of time gap or time lag between the generation of content and the public release of content in final form may be possible reasons that contribute to the difference in nature of interaction in the two ‘faceless’ mediated discursive spaces.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

The Collaborative Construction And Evolution Of Pseudo-Knowledge In Online Conversations [FULL]
Authors: Joshua Introne, Luca Iandoli, Julia Decook, Irem Gokce Yildirim and Shaimaa Elzeini

Abstract: Misinformation has found a new natural habitat in the digital age. Thousands of forums, blogs, and alternative news sources amplify inaccurate information to such a degree that it impacts our collective intelligence. Widespread misinformation is troubling not just because it is wrong, but also because it can persist in the face of attempts to correct it, becoming part of a larger culture of community-based pseudoknowledge (PK). Prior work has focused on the motivations and psychology of those who create and maintain PK but has eschewed inspection of the dynamics of collective PK production itself. In this exploratory case study, we illustrate how the active participation of multiple collaborators adapts PK over time through a process we liken to participatory storytelling. We argue that the Internet provides a uniquely well-suited environment for evolving PK that is “more fit” in that it is more engaging, easier to defend, and possibly easier to spread.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Branding Practices In The New(Er) Media: A Comparison Of Retailer Twitter And Web-Based Images [WIP]
Author: James Lannigan

Abstract: In this working paper I compare how retailers of different size use webpages and social media. I examine over 2800 unique images from 86 retailers, using a quantitative content analysis that enumerates visual elements within pictures. I find that there are significant differences in the use of these two mediums in terms of retailer scale, and that based on their size, retailers display different types of images at much different proportions.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Crisis And Collective Problem Solving In Dark Web: An Exploration Of A Black Hat Forum [WIP]
Authors: K. Hazel Kwon, J. Hunter Priniski, Soumajyoti Sarkar, Jana Shakarian and Paulo Shakarian

Abstract: This paper explores the process of collective crisis problem-solving in the darkweb. We conducted a preliminary study on “The Hub”, one of the Tor-based darkweb forums, during the shutdown of two marketplaces. Content analysis suggests that distrusts permeated the forum during the marketplace shutdowns. Much of sense-making effort was made to the debates concerned with suspicious claims and conspiracies. The results suggest that a market crisis potentially offers an opportunity for cyber-intelligence to disrupt the darkweb by engendering internal conflicts. At the same time, the study also shows that darkweb members were adept at reaching collective solutions by sharing new market information, more secure technologies, and alternative routes for economic activities.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

The Political Economy Of Social Data. A Historical Analysis Of Platform–Industry Partnerships [WIP]
Authors: Anne Helmond, David Nieborg and Fernando van der Vlist

Abstract: Social media industry partnerships are essential to understand the politics and economics of social data flowing between platforms and third-parties. We investigate how platform partnerships evolve over time to understand (i) the dynamic roles of platforms and partners as data brokers, (ii) their diversification by catering to a growing number of stakeholders, all with distinct interests, and (iii) their gradual entrenchment as dominant actors within the internet industry. We focus on Facebook the dominant platform that functions both as data aggregator and marketing platform that operates multiple dedicated partner programs and that cater to a wide array of industry partners. We employ a mixed methods approach. On the one hand, “digital methods” for mapping partnerships over time using archived pages of Facebook’s official partner program directories, as well as developer documentation from the Internet Archive to enquire into changing partnership types. On the other hand, we conducted semi-structured interviews with selected partners to contextualize their distinct roles, positions, and data strategies within the industry. By considering how partnership alliances are forged and subsequently dissolved over time, we offer insights into “stakeholder politics” as well as platforms’ entrenchment within the Internet industry. In brief, we aim to develop a critical account of the political economy of social data by addressing the infrastructural dimension of platform data power.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

TweetSight: Enhancing Financial Analysts' Social Media Use [FULL]
Authors: Rama Adithya Varanasi, Benjamin Hanrahan, Shahtab Wahid and John Carroll

Abstract: Financial analysts utilize information from heterogeneous sources (for example, corporate filings, economic indicators, news, and tweets) to generate unique trade ideas through a sensemaking process. In this paper, we seek to understand the role of social media in this process. We conducted a semi-structured interview and identified essential benefits and barriers for the primary social media platform used by the analysts - Twitter. Analysts use Twitter as a query exploration tool, as a bellwether to understand sentiment, and to gauge knock-on effects. Drawing from our findings, we developed four scenarios to guide the design of TweetSight. Finally, we evaluated the design of TweetSight by walking analysts through the prototype. Analysts responded positively to anchoring contextual tweets in news articles to facilitate discovery and exploration of Twitter. Our findings and design implications can be applied more broadly to leveraging social media for sensemaking, benefiting various business communities.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

11:01

Investigating The Patterns And Prevalence Of UK Trade Unionism On Twitter [WIP]
Authors: Wil Chivers and Helen Blakely

Abstract: This paper reports on on-going exploratory research into the prevalence and patterns of social media use by trade unions in the United Kingdom. Social media platforms, like Twitter, are used by unions to organise and mobilise existing and potential members by communicating relevant content, which often engages politicians and the news media. However, there is little empirical research examining how trade unions use social media in practice. This research addresses this gap by employing digital methods to analyse trade union activity on Twitter: exploring key characteristics of Twitter use by UK unions; and mapping dynamic networks of associations around labour movement issues. Findings are discussed in the context of collective and connective action. The methodological implications for studying civil society organisations online are also considered.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

11:01

Retweets For Policy Advocates: Tweet Diffusion In The Policy Discussion Space Of Universal Basic Income [FULL]
Authors: Jeff Hemsley, Martha A. Garcia-Murillo and Ian P. MacInnes

Abstract: Technological advances have increasingly automated tasks that have hitherto been done by humans. The disruption to the labor market is expected to grow as more and more jobs are lost to automation. Society would benefit from the open discussion of alternative policy approaches, such as Universal Basic Income (UBI), that can alleviate social tensions related to joblessness. In this study, we examine tweets related to the discussion of UBI in an effort to understand the types of messages most likely to spread information about policy innovations, and most likely to bring new voices into the discussion. We find that messages that resonate with users are more likely to reach new audiences and bring new actors into the discussion space. Our work offers prescriptions for policy advocates, and provides insights for social scientists studying Twitter and policy and information diffusion.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

11:01

Social Media Use By Government In Canada: Examining Interactions Of Immigration, Refugees And Citizenship Canada On Twitter And Facebook [WIP]
Authors: Maria Gintova

Abstract: In 2011, the need to use social media to interact with the public was acknowledged as a priority for Canadian government for the first time. The Open Dialogue stream of initiatives within the Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government called for a two-way dialogue between the Government of Canada and the public. Currently, the majority of government agencies use social media. However, they are still exploring the ways of using these new tools as a part of existing communication channels. As recent studies suggest, government does not consider social media as a way to engage public in government business but rather solely views it as a new means to provide information. This information might be already available on the government agency website.
This paper examines how one of the federal government agencies - Immigration, Citizenship and Refugees Canada (IRCC) uses social media. As the analysis shows, IRCC does interact with the public by answering questions, providing information about its programs and services and sharing information posted on other accounts. The findings indicate that (1) IRCC engages much more actively on Twitter than on Facebook; (2) IRCC views Twitter as a way to answers questions that immigrants, students, workers, visitors to Canada as well as Canadian citizens and permanent residents might have about its programs and services and (3) IRCC does not usually seek opinions and engage on policy development issues neither on Twitter nor on Facebook.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

11:01

The Paris Climate Talks (COP21) In Visual Social Media [WIP]
Authors: Jill Hopke and Luis Hestres

Abstract: Within networked, digital media spaces, new news platforms are reconfiguring traditional news production norms through hybrid cultural practices, giving rise to new paradigms of journalism. There is an increased emphasis on transparency and accountability, as well as interaction with audiences. At the same time, Internet-mediated activism allows individuals to foster larger, more diverse networks of weak ties, thus opening new avenues for advocacy communication. Climate change is increasingly becoming the backdrop to news stories on topics as varied as politics and international relations, science and the environment, economics and inequality, and popular culture. We use the Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP21) that took place in Paris November 30 to December 11, 2015, as a case study. The project focuses on COP21 coverage by British news outlet The Guardian, which launched a fossil fuel divestment campaign “Keep it In the Ground” in advance of COP21. We compare The Guardian’s discussion of climate solutions during COP21 with other news outlets and climate stakeholders.

Sunday July 30, 2017 11:01 - 12:30
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

12:30

Lunch (self-organized)

Sunday July 30, 2017 12:30 - 14:00
Self-organized Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

14:00

Panel 5A: Why Persona Studies: The Value Of The Persona Studies Approach For Research Into Online Identity And The Transformation Of The Public Self
Panel Speakers: P. David Marshall, Kim Barbour and Christopher Moore


Abstract: A great deal of research has been developing employing what is called Persona Studies to investigate social media. (See Marshall, 2014; Barbour and Marshall 2015, Marshall 2016: Marshall, Moore and Barbour, 2015, Moore and Turnbull (2017 forthcoming). Persona Studies research has emerged across an array of publications and has spawned the emergence of a new journal called Persona Studies itself.

This panel is designed to familiarize social media researchers with the value of this approach to the study of online culture. The panel is composed of the leading researchers in the area who have developed many of the foundational works and ideas that have advanced in this emerging sub-field. 

David Marshall will serve as the moderator and facilitator of the panel. In his introduction, he will introduce some of the key concepts and words that have emerged from this direction in research including:  
1. The meaning and deployment of the concept of Persona, 
2. Intercommunication, 
3. The interplay of Representational media and cultural regime and the Presentational media and cultural regime and 
4. The deployment of VARP (Value, Agency, Reputation, Prestige) analyses 
along with several other keywords. 

He will conclude his remarks with a brief description of his recent research on political persona and how social media has transformed what could be described as the political public self and his study of the medical and legal professions and their online personas. 

Kim Barbour will present on her recent persona research and how it is usefully applied in studying the online art scene as well as the digital academic persona. 
Chris Moore, along with providing a visual mapping of persona work in online settings, will help provide pathways for participants to understand how persona is neither an individual identity or a collective identity, but a strategic identity that negotiates the relationship between the individual and collective in several online and social media settings. 
 

Sunday July 30, 2017 14:00 - 15:00
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

14:00

Panel 5B: Social Media And The Transformation of Journalistic Practice
Panel Speakers: Nicole Cohen, Brian Creech, Errol Salamon and Maggie Reid


Abstract: This panel presents research examining the complex and often contradictory relationship between journalism and social media, drawing on political economic and critical perspectives as well as empirical research. As media industries rapidly adapt to a digital environment, journalistic outlets are increasingly using social media as a core component of news production. Social media is a reporting tool, a means of circulating and distributing news, and a mechanism for freelancers and precarious media workers to obtain and sustain work. This panel contributes to a growing body of research attending to the relationship between journalism and social media. Through four related papers, panelists interrogate the way the use of social media in news production is shaping journalists’ working conditions, transforming journalistic practice, altering the relationship between journalists and their subjects and sources, and enabling journalists to defend against labour precarity. The papers provide four entry points for researching the intersection of journalism, social media, and labour. 

The first paper reports on the results of a pilot study of digital-first journalists in North America labouring in networks of high-speed information production and circulation. The paper tracks the rise of the “social media journalist” and suggests several concepts for understanding this shift, including measurability, affective labour, speed, and commodification. Attending to the gendered dimensions of social media journalism, both who does this work and the qualities of the work, the paper argues that a re-gendering of journalism is underway. The second paper considers the political economic and postcolonial implications of Western journalists’ use of social media to engage in the "distant witnessing" of international conflicts, through tools and practices such as Twitter sourcing, cross-platform verification, and various analytics. It argues that social media tools are implicated in, and perhaps even accelerate, a longstanding power imbalance between the western journalistic gaze and the non-western bodies that exist in proximity to international violence. The third paper examines the dynamics of a shift toward entrepreneurial journalism, particularly the role social media plays in this new paradigm, which aims to foster among journalists entrepreneurship, business skills, and personal branding. The paper examines the risks and rewards of combining entrepreneurship and journalism and proposes a reconceptualization of the “audience commodity” and digital labour in the context of journalistic professionalization practices that include social media use. The fourth paper presents a case study of the role of digital technologies such as social media in the struggle for “e-lancer” rights. It analyzes the role of the International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) in representing and advocating for freelancers in a digital political economy and its use of social media to do so. The paper analyzes two IFJ social media campaigns and discusses how these industrial struggles provide evidence of the “e-lancer,” an internationally and electronically connected group of journalistic workers that temporarily resists restrictive copyright laws. 
 

Sunday July 30, 2017 14:00 - 15:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

14:00

Panel 5C: Good Girls / Bad Girls: Examining The Gender And Sexual Politics Of Socially Mediated Bodies
Panel Speakers: Katie Warfield, Lianna Pisani, Mylynn Felt and Stefanie Duguay


Abstract: Following the theme of the Social Media & Society Conference, a focus on the good and bad asks researchers to move beyond debating ontological debates and address how ethics figures into a given ontology on the object of inquiry. This panel takes as its focus female and female identifying bodies, identities, and subjectivities represented, presented, and embodied on social media. Instead of asking “what the socially mediated ‘woman’ is”, this panel pushes inquiry further to demand what the implications of our theoretical frameworks have on theorizing gender on social media? What happens when we say a “woman” online is this or that? What happens to real lived bodies when we declare what is a good girl or a bad girl? 

We further add to our discussions a foundational starting point of intersectionality so that the concept of “woman” is neither generalized, made invisible, nor taken for granted. It is for this reason that we use quotes around the term “woman” to emphasize its fundamentally constructed nature while also not diminishing its affective reality and political importance. Womanhood is intersectionally situated, diverse, and inclusive of any person who identifies as female. We foreground the importance of gender, race, sexuality, class, and ability in discussions of the good girls and bad girls on social media to recognise that “being a woman online” is complicated, layered, situated and changing. Aligning with the conference’s focus on the good and bad, this panel asks how the good and bad become complicated within multilayered power dynamics that privilege certain bodies, subjectivities, and identities over others. 

And so this panel looks at the theme of good and bad in research on female-identifying intersectionally diverse and socially mediated bodies, identities, and subjectivities. Stef Duguay examines the process of claiming digitally authentic displays of sexuality on Tinder for same-sex attracted women and how these women use refined strategies for detecting fake profiles which would result in “bad” dates. Via the case study of Amazon Wishlists, Lianna Pisani discusses how the genre of the “political feminist selfie” presents a salient case study of the selfie’s function as an effective medium for performing the body as representation in order to challenge the female body as a site of oppression. Katie Warfield challenges narrative linearity, singularity, and simplicity using feminist new materialism and post-phenomenology to narrate the multi-layered and materially and discursively entangled stories of Courtney Demone a woman and trans* activist who used Youtube, Instagram, Mashable, and Reddit to come out and perform a political campaign called “Do I have boobs now?” Mylynn Felt presents on the “solidarity selfie” as a genre through analyses of images shared during the 2017 Women’s March on Washington.  

This panel is situated at the evolving intersections of theorizing the socially mediated body. Beginning with the special issue for the International Journal of Communication edited by Nancy Baym and Theresa Senft, followed by a special issue of Social Media & Society edited by Katie Warfield, Carolina Cambre and Crystal Abidin, and a follow up panel on the socially mediated body at AoIR16 in Berlin, this panel will move discussions from theoretical frameworks towards action plans with an eye to ethics. The papers from the panel will be pitched as a special issue (Journal TBD) to show the genealogical shift of discussions while highlighting current empirical work in the field on the topic. 

Sunday July 30, 2017 14:00 - 15:00
TRS 1-147 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

14:00

Panel 5D: Connected Lives For Seniors And Immigrants: Wearables, Apps, And Social Media Barriers And Opportunities
Panel Speakers: Anabel Quan-Haase, Barry Wellman, Kendra Kamp, Guang Ying Mo and Sanja Vico


Abstract: The present panel brings together scholars who investigate the uses and social consequences of wearables, apps, and social media in the lives of older adults and immigrants. The panel will specifically draw on standpoint theory as developed by Dorothy Smith (1990). Standpoint theory proposes that depending on our background, gender, socioeconomic status, and age we view and understand society from different social locations. Often the view of dominant social groups is given more relevance and marginalized groups are less well understood. We adopt standpoint theory to examine how older adults are portrayed in the mainstream culture and how potential biases may also influence scholarship examining older adults. We present five papers, each drawing on a different data set, to explore different dimensions of how older adults integrate wearables, apps, and social media into their everyday life patterns and rhythms (Khosravi, et al., 2016). We argue that older adults can greatly benefit from using wearables, apps, and social media, but that this use needs to be on their own terms (Quan-Haase et al., 2016a). We hope to gain a better understanding of the complexities of aging and the intersection with wearables, apps, and social media by looking at diverse data sets and drawing conclusions across studies and tools. 


Each presenter will contribute through a paper based on original empirical work with older adults or immigrants as the population of study. Each presenter will describe the methodology utilized in the study as well as the key findings and implications for theory and policy concerning older adults.
 

Sunday July 30, 2017 14:00 - 15:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:00

Coffee Break
Sunday July 30, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
TRS 1-148 & 1-150 TRSM Commons - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3

15:30

Session 6A: Self Brand
Moderators
avatar for Ravi Vatrapu

Ravi Vatrapu

Director & Professor, Centre for Business Data Analytics, Copenhagen Business School

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

15:30

Session 6B: Bots
Moderators
avatar for Lina Gomez

Lina Gomez

Assistant Professor, Universidad del Este
Assistant Professor, Communication Program, School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Universidad del Este, Puerto Rico. | PhD in Business with a concentration in Corporate Social Responsibility and Organizational Sustainability from Universitat Jaume I in Castellón, Spain... Read More →

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:30

Session 6C: Social Media Use & Users
Moderators
avatar for Zoetanya Sujon

Zoetanya Sujon

Senior Lecturer, Regent's University London

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

Idols Of Promotion: The Triumph Of Self-Branding In The Social Media Age [WIP]
Authors: Brooke Erin Duffy and Jefferson Pooley

Abstract: YouTube stars, Instagram influencers, and other social media personalities have achieved an elevated status in the popular imagination. This work-in-progress situates the valorization of digital fame in a socio-historical context, invoking critical theorist Leo Lowenthal’s [1] “mass idols” framework. Examining the content of magazine biographies in the decades preceding World War II, Lowenthal identified a marked shift in cultural exemplars of success: from self-made entrepreneurs, politicians, and other “Idols of Production”—to the stars of cinema and sports, “Idols of Consumption.” As an extension of Lowenthal’s analysis, we examine contemporary magazine biographies (in People and Time) and self-authored social media bios (on Instagram and Twitter). Based on a preliminary analysis of the magazine content and social-media profiles—including the crucial shift to self-authorship—we outline a new generation of what we call “Idols of Promotion.” These digitally networked public figures, we argue, straddle the realms of production and consumption as they labor to create and project a distinctive self-brand. We identify three key tropes that shape narrativizations of idols in the social media age: (1) a spirit of self-enterprise that crosses industry boundaries; (2) a promise of meritocracy; and (3) a call to express oneself authentically. After examining these tropes, we conclude with an examination of their ideological function: such mediated hero-worship, we contend, indexes larger anxieties about the individualization of work amidst a precarious economy.

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

15:31

Platform-Specific Self-Branding: Imagined Affordances Of The Social Media Ecology [FULL]
Authors: Brooke Erin Duffy, Urszula Pruchniewska and Leah Scolere

Abstract: Despite the recent uptick in literature on self-branding across the fields of internet studies, business/marketing, and media/cultural industries, the ways in which the digital self-brand gets reproduced across a sprawling social media ecology remains comparatively under-theorized. Our paper draws upon in-depth interviews with 42 creative workers—including designers/artists, bloggers/writers, online content creators, and marketers/ publicists—to understand how independent professionals present themselves and their work in the digital economy. We show that despite the common refrain of maintaining a “consistent” online persona, creative workers continuously negotiate their self-presentation activities through a logic we term platform-specific self-branding. The platform-specific self-brand, we contend, is based upon the “imagined affordances” [43] of individual platforms and their placement within the larger social media ecology. Such imaginations are constructed through the interplay between: 1). platform features; 2) assumptions about the audience; and 3). and the producer’s own self-concept. We conclude that creative workers’ incitement to incessantly monitor and re-fashion their digital personae in platform-specific ways marks an intensification of the “always on” laboring subjectivity required to vie for attention in a precarious creative economy.

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

15:31

When Private And Professional Lives Meet: The Impact Of Digital Footprints On Employees And Political Candidates [WIP]
Authors: Riham Mohamed, Thais Bardini Idalino and Sonia Chiasson

Abstract: We present the results of a between-subjects survey with 459 participants to gather opinions of privacy and how such online content should impact job candidates and political candidates, respectively. Our analysis explores differences between the two scenarios, and whether demographic characteristics influence users’ perspectives towards politicians and/or employees. Overall, respondents were less tolerant of the online activities of political candidates. We conclude the paper with a discussion of how the concept of online privacy is evolving in this age of social media.

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-073 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

15:31

Can We Trust Social Media Data? Social Network Manipulation By An IoT Botnet [FULL]
Authors: Masarah Paquet-Clouston, Olivier Bilodeau and David Décary-Hétu

Abstract: The size of an account’s audience – in terms of followers or friends count – is believed to be a good measure of its influence and popularity. To gain quick artificial popularity on online social networks (OSN), one can buy likes, follows and views from social media fraud (SMF) services. Social media fraud (SMF) is the generation of likes, follows and views on OSN such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram. Using a research method that combines computer sciences and social sciences, this paper provides a deeper understanding of the illicit market for SMF. It conducts a market price analysis for SMF, describes the operations of a supplier – an Internet of things (IoT) botnet performing SMF – and provides a profile of the potential customers of such fraud. The paper explains how an IoT botnet conduct social network manipulation and illustrates that the fraud is driven by OSN users, the entertainers, small online shops and private users that create the demand. It also illustrates that OSN strategy to suspend fake accounts only cleans the networks a posteriori of the fraud and does not deter the crime – the botnet – or the fraud – SMF – from happening. Several solutions to deter the fraud are provided.

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:31

Identifying Bots In The Australian Twittersphere [WIP]
Author: Brenda Moon

Abstract: Identification of bots on Twitter can be difficult, and successful approaches often use an iterative workflow, applying different techniques to identify different groups of bots. This paper presents first results of the application of this iterative workflow to the Australian TrISMA collection, which contains the tweets of over 4 million Twitter accounts identified as being Australian. To our knowledge this research undertakes the first comprehensive identification of bots in the Australian Twittersphere. The identified bots are then classified by bot type and the proportion of overall account and tweet numbers they represent determined.

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:31

Twitter Bot Surveys: A Discrete Choice Experiment To Increase Response Rates [WIP]
Authors: Juan Pablo Alperin, Erik Warren Hanson, Kenneth Shores and Stefanie Haustein

Abstract: This paper presents a new methodology—the Twitter bot survey—that bridges the gap between social media research and web surveys. The methodology uses the Twitter APIs to identify a target population and then uses the API to deliver a question in the form of a regular Tweet. We hypothesized that this method would yield high response rates because users are posed a question within the social media platform and are not asked, as is the case with most web surveys, to follow a link away to a third party. To evaluate the response rate and identify the most effective mechanism for increasing it, we conducted a discrete choice experiment that evaluated three factors: question type, the use of an egoistic appeal, and the presence of contextual information. We found that, similar to traditional web surveys, multiple choice questions, egoistic appeals, and contextual information all contributed to higher response rates. Question variants that combined all three yielded a 40.0% response rate, thereby outperforming most other web surveys and demonstrating the promise of this new methodology. The approach can be extended to any other social media platforms where users typically interact with one another. The approach also offers the opportunity to bring together the advantages of social media research using APIs with the richness of information that can be collected from surveys.

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-075 - 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C9

15:31

Social Media For Social Good: A Study Of Experiences And Opportunities In Rural Australia [FULL]
Authors: Lisa Given, Denise Winkler and Kathryn Wallis

Abstract: Social media platforms are espoused as helpful for overcoming the tyranny of distance for rural people and businesses, connecting them with local and global communities. Yet, little research has been conducted to document social media use by rural residents. This paper explores the social media experiences of 62 rural Australians, gathered through focus group and individual interviews. Results reveal the varied ways that rural residents use social media, for personal and work activities. Positive and negative perceptions of social media tools provide detailed insights into rural residents’ views. Participants highlighted opportunities to harness the potential of social media to further their business interests, to build social networks and to advocate for issues important to rural people.

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

Super Bowl Live Tweets: The Usage of Social Media during a Sporting Event
Authors: Youngsub Han, Beomseok Hong and Kwangmi Ko Kim

Abstract: The development and popularity of social networking sites (SNS) and technology have changed the audience’s media consumption patterns, particularly TV viewing. TV audiences share their viewing experiences real-time through computer-mediated communication, which creates a pseudo-communal viewing experience. Typically, social media is well known for assisting this new form of TV viewing practice. There is an emerging body of literature on what types of messages people share with others while they are watching TV and how those messages and conversations are related to the context of the program they are watching. However, little research has been conducted on social TV with a sport game. Therefore, this study plans to analyze the viewer’s social TV behaviors and engagement during a Super Bowl game and further compare whether the “coverage of conversations” is related to the nature of the game.

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

The Presentation Of Selfie In Everyday Life: Considering The Relationship Between Social Media Design And User In The Online Actions And Interactions Of Young People [FULL]
Author: Harry Dyer

Abstract: Against a backdrop of young people increasingly using an array of social media platforms for a range of social activities (Greenwood et al., 2016), accessed through a variety of devices (Lenhart, 2015), this paper reports upon the findings of a research project considering the effect of these platforms upon the actions and interactions of young people.

Reporting on findings from a series of interviews conducted over the course of a year with 9 participants, the research discusses the participants’ thoughts and impressions of the platforms, their uses of specific features, their social actions and interactions, and the effects of changes in their offline lives and their specific socio-cultural situations upon their online interactions.

The findings reveal a range of social media engagements by young people across a wide array of platforms, with the participants’ specific concerns and needs shaping how they engaged with social media. It was also found that the platforms played a role in shaping the actions and interactions of the young people, confining what was possible for them and informing how they approached social interaction on each platform. As such, it was noted that online social interactions are increasingly nuanced and multi-faceted, and therefore that an approach towards analyzing interactions online needs to account for the interplay between design and user from which unique and ongoing interactions emerge.

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

15:31

“I’m An Addict” And Other Sensemaking Devices: A Discourse Analysis Of Self-Reflections On Lived Experience Of Social Media [FULL]
Authors: Katrin Tiidenberg, Annette N Markham, Gabriel O Pereira, Mads M Rehder, Jannek K Sommer, Ramona-Riin Dremljuga and Meghan Dougherty

Abstract: How do young people make sense of their social media experiences, which rhetoric do they use, which grand narratives of technology and social media do they rely on? Based on discourse analysis of approximately 500 pages of written data and 390 minutes of video (generated by 50 college students aged 18 - 30 between 2014 - 2016) this article explores how young people negotiate their own experience and existing discourses about social media. Our analysis shows that young people rely heavily on canonic binaries from utopian and dystopian interpretations of networked technologies to apply labels to themselves, others, and social media in general. As they are prompted to reflect on their experience, they begin to add nuanced yet inherently contradictory rhetoric of social media use and its implications. This reflects a dialectical struggle to make sense of their lived experiences and feelings against dominant normative discourses. Our unique methodology for generating deeply self-reflexive, auto-ethnographic narrative accounts suggests a way for scholars to combine micro-sociological tools with auto-ethnographic approaches to understand the ongoing struggles for meaning that occur within the granularity of everyday reflections about our own social media use.

Sunday July 30, 2017 15:31 - 17:00
TRS 1-077- 7th Flr Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C19

17:00

Wrap-Up/Social (self-organized)
Sunday July 30, 2017 17:00 - 19:00
Self-organized Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON M5G 2C3